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All-Time Teams: Cincinnati Bengals



Introduction

In my endless research of all things football and through my passion for the history of the NFL, I have decided to try and compile an All-Time Team for all 32 current NFL franchises. By All-Time Team I mean a starting roster compiled of the very best players to ever put on each franchise’s jersey. I will be starting in alphabetical order by current franchise location, so Arizona Cardinals all the way to The Washington Football Team, with the goal of releasing one to two All-Time teams a week for the duration of the current NFL season. This is meant to be fun and cause some debate and is based on my opinion after all my research and deep dives into each franchise’s history. Of course, not everyone will agree with who I chose, and I’d love to hear from anyone who agrees or disagrees, but first, let’s lay out some ground rules for how I came up with each team.


1. Each team roster will consist of the following:

Offense - 1 QB, 2 RB, 3 WR, 1 TE, 2 OT, 2 OG, 1 C

Defense - 2 DE, 2 DT, 3 LB, 2 CB, 2 S

Special Teams - 1 K, 1 P, 1 Returner

Coach - 1 Head Coach


2. I only considered an individual’s stats and contributions with each specific franchise. For example, Peyton Manning’s years with the Broncos were not considered when deciding on the starting QB of the Colts All-Time Team. As a result, the stats and awards listed with each individual player are only those that were achieved with that specific franchise.


3. A player cannot represent two teams as the starter. Players who spent time with more than one team were considered for the franchise they spent the most time with or had the most impact on. This rule led to some interesting scenarios that I will discuss in detail with each specific article to try and clear up any confusion.


4. A player’s stats and impact were considered in context with their era. This won’t simply be a listing of who passed or ran for the most yards in franchise history.


5. All stats are from Pro-Football-Reference and through the 2021 season. I will also be counting sacks from 1960, though the NFL doesn't officially count sacks until 1982.


6. Players in the "Honorable Mentions" section are ordered by year. It's not an indication of where I believe they rank in franchise history.


Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get to it!


Cincinnati Bengals All-Time Team


Franchise Information

First Season: 1968

Record: 373-459-5 (44.83 W-L%)

Playoff Record: 8-15

Super Bowls Won: 0 (Lost in 1981, 1988 and 2021)

Passing Leader: Ken Anderson 2,654/4,475 | 32,838 Yds | 197 TD

Rushing Leader: Corey Dillon 1,865 Att | 8,061 Yds | 45 TD

Receiving Leader: Chad Johnson 751 Rec | 10,783 Yds | 66 TD

Sack Leader: Eddie Edwards 84.5 Sk

Interception Leader: Ken Riley 65 Int

Scoring Leader: Jim Breech 1,151 Points

Winningest Coach: Marvin Lewis 131-122-3


QB: Ken Anderson (1971-1986)

Record: 91-81 | 59.3 Cmp% | 32,838 Yds | 197 TD | 160 Int | 2,220 Rush Yds | 20 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp 1974 and 1982 (213, 218) | Led League in Cmp% 1974, 1982 and 1983 (64.9, 70.6, 66.7) |Led League in Yds/A 1974 and 1975 (8.1, 8.4) | Led League in Yds 1974 and 1975 (2,667, 3,169) | Led League in Yds/G 1974 and 1975 (205.2, 243.8) | Led League in QB Rating 1974, 1975, 1981 and 1982 (95.7, 93.9, 98.4, 95.3) | 4x Pro-Bowl (75, 76, 81, 82) | 1x All-Pro (81) | 1981 MVP | 1981 Offensive Player of the Year | 1981 Bert Bell | 1981 Comeback Player of the Year | 1975 Walter Payton Man of the Year | 1981 AFC Champion


Buckle in because this is going to be a long one. Ken Anderson is the most underrated player in NFL history, period. How he gets overlooked by Hall of Fame voters year in and year out is mind boggling. Anderson led the Bengals to seven winning seasons and four playoff appearances in his 16 seasons in Cincinnati. He was one of the most accurate quarterbacks of his time, leading the league in completions twice, completion percentage three times and quarterback rating four times. Anderson also led the league in yards, yards per attempt and yards per game twice each. He was named to four Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team as well as being named the 1981 MVP and Offensive Player of the Year. Anderson guided the Bengals to the Super Bowl in that 1981 season, but they unfortunately lost to Joe Montana and the 49ers.


If this isn't enough to convince you he deserves a gold jacket, then compare Anderson to the other quarterbacks of his era that are already in the Hall. Anderson has a better career completion percentage than Bradshaw, Fouts, Griese, Staubach and Tarkenton. He has more yards than Bradshaw, Griese, Stabler and Staubach, more touchdowns than Griese, Stabler and Staubach and less interceptions than Bradshaw, Fouts, Griese, Stabler and Tarkenton. Anderson, Bradshaw, Stabler and Tarkenton were all once named MVP. Anderson led the league in completion percentage in more seasons than any of them and only Fouts led the league in yards on more occasions. Staubach and Anderson each led the league in quarterback rating four times each. You may say "but he never won a championship", well neither did seven other quarterbacks currently in the Hall of Fame. Finally, he was seventh in yards and 12th in touchdowns in NFL history at retirement. Just put him in the Hall already.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Boomer Esiason (1984-1992, 1997) | Record: 62-61 | 56.4 Cmp% | 27,149 Yds | 187 TD | 131 Int | 1,355 Rush Yds | 5 Rush TD | Led League in QB Rating 1988 (97.4) | Led League in Yds/A 1986 and 1988 (8.4, 9.2) | 3x Pro-Bowl (86, 88, 89) | 1x All-Pro (88) | 1988 MVP | 1988 AFC Champion

  2. Jeff Blake (1994-1999) | Record: 25-41 | 55.8 Cmp% | 15,134 Yds | 93 TD | 62 Int | 1,499 Rush Yds | 10 Rush TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (95)

  3. Carson Palmer (2004-2010) | Record: 46-51 | 62.9 Cmp% | 22,694 Yds | 154 TD | 100 Int | 316 Rush Yds | 5 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp% 2005 (67.8) | Led League in TD 2005 (32) | 2x Pro-Bowl (05, 06)

  4. Andy Dalton (2011-2019) | Record: 70-61-2 | 62 Cmp% | 31,594 Yds | 204 TD | 118 Int | 1,221 Rush Yds | 22 Rush TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (11, 14, 16)

  5. Joe Burrow (2020-Present) | Record: 12-13-1 | 7,299 Yds | 47 TD | 19 Int | 260 Rush Yds | 5 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp% 2021 (70.4%) | Led League in Yds/A 2021 (8.9) | 2021 Comeback Player of the Year | 2021 AFC Champion


RB: Corey Dillon (1997-2003)

4.3 Yds/A | 8,061 Yds | 45 TD | 192 Rec | 1,482 Rec Yds | 5 Rec TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (99, 00, 01)


Corey Dillon is the first running back for the All-Time Bengals. He's the franchise record holder in rushing yards and ran for at least 1,000 yards in six of his seven seasons in Cincinnati. He made three straight Pro-Bowls from 1999-2001 and had double digit touchdowns in two seasons. Dillon was one of the best backs in the NFL at the turn of the century and has an outside shot to make the Hall of Fame one day. He was also impossible to tackle in the video game NFL Street, so that's a plus too.


RB: James Brooks (1984-1991)

4.8 Yds/A | 6,447 Yds | 37 TD | 297 Rec | 3,012 Yds | 27 Rec TD | Led Leagues in Yds/A 1986 (5.3) | 4x Pro-Bowl (86, 88, 89, 90)


For the other running back position, I'm going with James Brooks. Brooks held the franchise record for rushing yards before Corey Dillon broke it. Brooks was a versatile back who could beat you on the ground or through the air. He has just under 10,000 yards from scrimmage and made four Pro-Bowls. He was also a key member of the Bengals team that made it to the Super Bowl in 1988. Pete Johnson is the franchise record holder in touchdowns with 64, so I almost went with him, but Brooks gets the edge since he was a much bigger receiving threat.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Paul Robinson (1968-1972) | 4.0 Yds/A | 2,441 Yds | 19 TD | 69 Rec | 454 Rec Yds | 2 Rec TD | Led League in Yds 1968 (1,023) | Led League in TD 1968 (8) | Led League in Yds/G 1968 (73.1) | 2x Pro-Bowl (68, 69) | 1x All-Pro (68)

  2. Archie Griffin (1976-1982) | 4.1 Yds/A | 2,808 Yds | 7 TD | 192 Rec | 1,607 Rec Yds | 6 Rec TD

  3. Pete Johnson (1977-1983) | 3.9 Yds/A | 5,421 Yds | 64 TD | 173 Rec | 1,327 Rec Yds | 6 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (81)

  4. Ickey Woods (1988-1991) | 4.6 Yds/A | 1,525 Yds | 27 TD | 47 Rec | 397 Rec Yds | Led League in Yds/A 1988 (5.3)

  5. Harold Green (1990-1995) | 3.9 Yds/A | 3,727 Yds | 8 TD | 145 Rec | 1,004 Rec Yds | 3 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (92)

  6. Rudi Johnson (2001-2007) | 4.0 Yds/A | 5,742 Yds | 48 TD | 101 Rec | 588 Rec Yds | 1 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (04)

  7. Joe Mixon (2017-Present) | 4.1 Yds/A | 4,564 Yds | 33 TD | 171 Rec | 1,322 Rec Yds | 8 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (21)


WR: Chad Johnson (2001-2010)

751 Rec | 10,783 Yds | 66 TD | Led League in Yds 2006 (1,369) | Led League in Yds/G 2006 (85.6) | 6x Pro-Bowl (03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 09) | 2x All-Pro (05, 06)


Chad Johnson was one of the most outspoken wide receivers in NFL history, but he had the skills to back it up. He holds the franchise records in receptions, yards and touchdowns and made six Pro-Bowls and two All-Pro Teams in Cincinnati. His best season came in 2006, when he led the league in yards with 1,369. He had over 80 catches in five seasons and over 1,000 yards in seven. Johnson has a decent shot to make the Hall of Fame one day, but he may have to wait awhile.


WR: A.J. Green (2011-2020)

649 Rec | 9,430 Yds | 65 TD | 7x Pro-Bowl (11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17)


A.J. Green almost passed Johnson's franchise records but left for Arizona one season before doing so. He ranks second in receptions, yards and touchdowns for the Bengals. He made seven straight Pro-Bowls from 2011-2017. He was Andy Dalton's go to target for 10 seasons and cemented himself and an all-time great Bengal. Green had over 1,000 yards in six seasons and over 10 touchdowns in three. His best season came in 2013 when he had over 1,400 yards and 11 touchdowns.


WR: Carl Pickens (1992-1999)

530 Rec | 6,887 Yds | 63 TD | Led League in TD 1995 (17) | 2x Pro-Bowl (95, 96) | 1992 Offensive Rookie of the Year


The third receiver position for the Bengals was a tough choice. Carl Pickens, Isaac Curtis and Cris Collinsworth all have a good claim for this spot. Ultimately, I went with Pickens. Pickens had over 1,000 yards in four different seasons with the Bengals and over 10 touchdowns three times, including leading the league with 17 in 1995. He made two Pro-Bowls and was voted Offensive Rookie of the Year in 1992. Curtis never had as dominant seasons as Pickens, he never had over 1,000 yards and Collinsworth made one more Pro-Bowl, but he caught almost 30 less touchdowns. Pickens gets overlooked because he played on the not very good Bengals teams of the 1990s.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Chip Myers (1969-1976) | 218 Rec | 3,079 Yds | 12 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (72)

  2. Isaac Curtis (1973-1984) | 416 Rec | 7,101 Yds | 53 TD | Led League in Yds/R 1975 (21.2) | 4x Pro-Bowl (73, 74, 75, 76)

  3. Cris Collinsworth (1981-1988) | 417 Rec | 6,698 Yds | 36 TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (81, 82, 83)

  4. Eddie Brown (1985-1991) | 363 Rec | 6,134 Yds | 41 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (88) | 1985 Offensive Rookie of the Year

  5. Tim McGee (1986-1992, 1994) | 282 Rec | 4,703 Yds | 25 TD

  6. Darnay Scott (1994-2001) | 386 Rec | 5,975 Yds | 36 TD

  7. T.J. Houshmandzadeh (2001-2008) | 507 Rec | 5,782 Yds | 37 TD | Led League in Rec 2007 (112) | 1x Pro-Bowl (07)


TE: Bob Trumpy (1968-1977)

298 Rec | 4,600 Yds | 35 TD | 4x Pro-Bowl (68, 69, 70, 73) | 1x All-Pro (69)


Bob Trumpy is a very overlooked player in Bengals and NFL history. He made four Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team with the Bengals and was a key member of the first season in Bengals history. His best season came in 1969 when he had over 800 yards and nine touchdowns on only 37 receptions. Trumpy gets the edge over Holeman due to his much more dominant peak receiving seasons.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Dan Ross (1979-1983, 1985) | 263 Rec | 3,204 Yds | 16 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (82)

  2. Rodney Holeman (1982-1992) | 318 Rec | 4,329 Yds | 34 TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (88, 89, 90)

  3. Tony McGee (1993-2001) | 299 Rec | 3,795 Yds | 20 TD

  4. Jermaine Gresham (2010-2014) | 280 Rec | 2,722 Yds | 24 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (11, 12)

  5. Tyler Eifert (2013-2019) | 185 Rec | 2,152 Yds | 24 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (15)


OT: Anthony Munoz (1980-1992)

Started 184 of 185 Games | 11x Pro-Bowl (81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91) | 9x All-Pro (81, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90) | 1991 Walter Payton Man of the Year | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team | Hall of Fame Class of 1998


Arguably the best offensive tackle in NFL history and certainly the best Bengal ever, Anthony Munoz, is the most obvious selection for the All-Time Bengals. He made an insane 11 straight Pro-Bowls from 1981-1991 and an even more ridiculous nine All-Pro Teams. Munoz played in every game of the season 10 different times and was a member of both Bengals teams that made the Super Bowl. He was named to the Hall of Fame All-1980s Team and inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998.


OT: Willie Anderson (1996-2007)

Started 173 of 181 Games | 4x Pro-Bowl (03, 04, 05, 06) | 3x All-Pro (04, 05, 06)


Willie Anderson is the other offensive tackles for the All-Time Bengals. He may one day join Munoz in the Hall of Fame. He Played in over 180 games with the Bengals, being named to four Pro-Bowls and three All-Pro Teams. He played in every game in 10 seasons with Cincinnati. Andrew Whitworth almost gets this spot, but Anderson played in more games and made more Pro-Bowls and All-Pro Teams.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Rufus Mayes (1969-1978) | Started 98 of 110 Games

  2. Vern Holland (1971-1979) | Started 118 of 119 Games

  3. Mike Wilson (1978-1985) | Started 112 of 114 Games

  4. Joe Walter (1985-1997) | Started 136 of 166 Games

  5. Andrew Whitworth (2006-2016) | Started 164 of 168 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (12, 15, 16) | 1x All-Pro (15)


OG: Max Montoya (1979-1989)

Started 144 of 157 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (86, 88, 89)


Max Montoya is the first offensive guard for this All-Time Bengals Team. He played in over 150 games with the Bengals, making three Pro-Bowls. He was also a member of both Bengals teams that made it to the Super Bowl. He played in every game in eight seasons as well.


OG: Bobbie Williams (2004-2011)

Started 118 of 118 Games


After Montoya, there is a drop off in offensive guard. Ultimately, I went with Bobbie Williams, which might be somewhat of a surprise. He gets the edge over Dave Lapham because he started in every game in six out of eight seasons with Cincinnati, whereas Lapham only did this in three seasons.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Howard Fest (1968-1975) | Started 93 of 112 Games

  2. Dave Lapham (1974-1983) | Started 105 of 140 Games

  3. Clint Boling (2011-2018) | Started 109 of 111 Games


C: Bob Johnson (1968-1979)

Started 136 of 154 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (68)


At center is Bob Johnson. He is the only center in Bengals history to make a Pro-Bowl, doing so in the team's first season ever, 1968. Johnson was the first draft selection the Bengals ever made, and he started every game in nine different seasons. He's also the only Bengal to have his number retired.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bruce Kozerski (1984-1995) | Started 137 of 172 Games

  2. Rich Braham (1994-2006) | Started 142 of 146 Games


DE: Carlos Dunlap (2010-2020)

2 Int | 20 FF | 9 FR | 82.5 Sk | 472 Tackles | 103 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (15, 16)


Carlos Dunlap is the first defensive end for the All-Time Bengals. He was a dominant force on the defensive line for a decade in Cincinnati. He has the second most sacks in franchise history and made the Pro-Bowl in 2015 and 2016. His best season came in 2015, where he had 13 sacks and 16 tackles for loss.


DE: Eddie Edwards (1977-1988)

1 Int | 17 FR | 84.5 Sk


The other end of the defensive line is Eddie Edwards. He never made a Pro-Bowl or All-Pro Team, but he was a consistent force with the Bengals for 12 seasons. His 84.5 sacks are a franchise record and he had over 10 sacks in three different seasons. Coy Bacon was great with Bengals, including a 21.5 sack season, but he only spent two seasons in Cincinnati, so Edwards and Dunlap get the starting positions.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Coy Bacon (1976-1977) | 4 FR | 27 Sk | Led League in Sk 1976 (21.5) | 2x Pro-Bowl (76, 77)

  2. Ross Browner (1978-1986) | 1 Int | 10 FR | 61.5 Sk

  3. John Copeland (1993-2000) | 3 Int | 9 FF | 3 FR | 24 Sk | 324 Tackles

  4. Justin Smith (2001-2007) | 2 Int | 6 FF | 5 FR | 43.5 Sk | 470 Tackles | 55 TFL

  5. Robert Geathers (2004-2014) | 3 Int | 7 FF | 5 FR | 34 Sk | 326 Tackles | 44 TFL

  6. Michael Johnson (2009-2018) | 4 Int | 6 FF | 4 FR | 40.5 Sk | 371 Tackles | 60 TFL


DT: Geno Atkins (2010-2020)

8 FF | 2 FR | 75.5 Sk | 384 Tackles | 100 TFL | 8x Pro-Bowl (11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19) | 2x All-Pro (12, 15) | Hall of Fame All-2010s Team


Geno Atkins is the obvious choice at defensive tackle for the All-Time Bengals. He was one of the best defensive tackles in the league for a decade, being named to eight Pro-Bowls and two All-Pro Teams. He had over 10 sacks in three different seasons, including a career best 12.5 in 2012. Atkins was named to the Hall of Fame All-2010s Team as well and he may end up making the Hall of Fame one day once he decides to retire.


DT: Tim Krumrie (1983-1994)

3 FF | 13 FR | 34.5 Sk | 1,017 Tackles | 2x Pro-Bowl (87, 88) | 1x All-Pro (88)


The other defensive tackle for All-Time Bengals is Tim Krumrie. He is somewhat of a forgotten star for the Bengals. He has over 1,000 tackles and was named to two Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. He had 152 tackles in 1988, from the nose tackle position! He gets the edge over Mike Reid since Reid only played for the Bengals for four seasons, though those four seasons were dominant.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Mike Reid (1970-1974) | 2 FR | 49 Sk | 2x Pro-Bowl (72, 73) | 1x All-Pro (72)

  2. Ron Carpenter (1970-1976) | 10 FR | 45.5 Sk

  3. Domata Peko (2006-2016) | 3 FF | 4 FR | 18.5 Sk | 517 Tackles | 39 TFL


LB: Reggie Williams (1976-1989)

16 Int | 23 FR | 63.5 Sk | Led League in FR 1982 (4) | 1986 Walter Payton Man of the Year


The linebacker position for the Bengals is a little thin. First off is Reggie Williams, who spent 14 seasons in Cincinnati. Williams was a leader on the defense for both teams that made it to the Super Bowl. His best season came in 1981 when he had 11 sacks. He also led the league in forced fumbles in 1982 with four. He somehow never made a Pro-Bowl or All-Pro Team, but he was named the 1986 Walter Payton Man of the Year.


LB: Jim LeClair (1972-1983)

10 Int | 10 FR | 7.5 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (76)


The next linebacker for the All-Time Bengals is Jim LeClair. He spent 12 seasons with the Bengals at middle linebacker, being named to the Pro-Bowl in 1976. He played in every game in seven seasons and was a leader for the Bengals team that made the Super Bowl in 1981.


LB: James Francis (1990-1998)

11 Int | 11 FF | 8 FR | 33 Sk | 556 Tackles


The final linebacker for the All-Time Bengals is James Francis. I went with Francis over others due to his nine consistent seasons and ability to rush the passer. He never made a Pro-Bowl or All-Pro Team, but this is due more in part to him being a member of not very good Bengals teams of the 1990s. Bill Bergey spent more time with the Eagles and Vontaze Burfict was only able to play in every game in two seasons.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Al Beauchamp (1968-1975) | 15 Int | 7 FR | 8.5 Sk

  2. Bill Bergey (1969-1973) | 9 Int | 6 FR | 4.5 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (69)

  3. Bo Harris (1975-1982) | 7 Int | 5 FR | 16.5 Sk

  4. Glenn Cameron (1975-1985) | 5 Int | 3 FR | 7 Sk

  5. Brian Simmons (1998-2006) | 11 Int | 13 FF | 8 FR | 23 Sk | 726 Tackles | 52 TFL

  6. Ray Maualuga (2009-2016) | 7 Int | 6 FF | 3 FR | 4 Sk | 584 Tackles | 20 TFL

  7. Vontaze Burfict (2012-2018) | 5 Int | 4 FF | 5 FR | 8.5 Sk | 604 Tackles | 35 TFL | Led League in Tackles 2013 (171) | 1x Pro-Bowl (13)


CB: Ken Riley (1969-1983)

65 Int | 18 FR | 1 Sk | 1x All-Pro (83)


Ken Riley is one of the greatest Bengals of all time and it's crazy how overlooked he was during his 15 seasons in Cincinnati. His 65 interceptions rank him fifth all-time and ranked him fourth at retirement. He had at least one interception in all 15 seasons and at least five interceptions in seven seasons. Riley's career best came in 1976 when he intercepted nine passes. He was finally voted to the All-Pro Team in his final season, when he intercepted eight passes, but was still not voted to the Pro-Bowl.


CB: Lemar Parrish (1970-1977)

25 Int | 10 FR | 6x Pro-Bowl (70, 71, 74, 75, 76, 77)


The other starting cornerback is Lemar Parrish. Parrish was teammates with Ken Riley every year with the Bengals, making one of the best cornerback duos of all time. His best season with the Bengals came in 1971 when he intercepted seven passes. He was voted to six Pro-Bowls, including four straight from 1974-1977. Louis Breeden was voted to the All-Pro Team in 1982, but Parrish's six Pro-Bowls are hard to overlook.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Louis Breeden (1978-1987) | 33 Int | 3 FR | 4 Sk | 1x All-Pro (82)

  2. Eric Thomas (1987-1992) | 15 Int | 2 FR | 3 Sk | 239 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (88)

  3. Deltha O’Neal (2004-2007) | 16 Int | 2 FF | 3 FR | 1 Sk | 194 Tackles | 3 TFL | Led League in Int 2005 (10) | 1x Pro-Bowl (05)

  4. Leon Hall (2007-2015) | 26 Int | 5 FF | 2 FR | 472 Tackles | 11 TFL

  5. Adam Jones (2010-2017) | 12 Int | 5 FF | 6 FR | 2 Sk | 352 Tackles | 6 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (15)


S: David Fulcher (1986-1992)

31 Int | 9 FR | 8.5 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (88, 89, 90) | 1x All-Pro (89)


The Bengals have two very good safeties who no one seems to talk about. David Fulcher intercepted 31 passes in seven seasons with the Bengals and was named to three straight Pro-Bowls from 1988-1990. Fulcher was also named to the All-Pro Team in 1989. He was the key defensive back for the Bengals who made the Super Bowl in 1988. His best season was 1989, where he intercepted eight passes.


S: Tommy Casanova (1972-1977)

17 Int | 3 FR | 2.5 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (74, 76, 77) | 1x All-Pro (76)

The other safety is Tommy Casanova. He also made three Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. He had five interceptions in both 1972 and 1976. He and Reggie Nelson both had short but sweet careers with the Bengals, but I give the edge to Casanova for being more dominant compared to his peers, hence the more Pro-Bowls and All-Pros. Nelson did have the better single season when he led the league with eight interceptions in 2015.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Reggie Nelson (2010-2015) | 23 Int | 5 FF | 5 FR | 5.5 Sk | 462 Tackles | 21 TFL | Led League in Int 2015 (8) | 1x Pro-Bowl (15)

  2. Shawn Williams (2013-2020) | 12 Int | 1 FF | 3 FR | 3 Sk | 424 Tackles | 14 TFL


K: Shayne Graham (2003-2009)

86.8 FG% | 53 Long | 779 Points | 1x Pro-Bowl (05)


Some may argue Jim Breech in this spot, as he's the franchise leader in points, but I'm giving this spot to Graham. He was extremely accurate in his seven seasons in Cincinnati, making over 86% of his field goals. He also made the Pro-Bowl in 2005.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jim Breech (1980-1992) | 71.9 FG% | 53 Long | 1,151 Points

  2. Doug Pelfrey (1993-1999) | 77.3 FG% | 54 Long | 660 Points | Led League in Long 1994 (54)

  3. Mike Nugent (2010-2016) | 81.9 FG% | 55 Long | 718 Points


P: Kevin Huber (2009-Present)

44,426 Punt Yds | 75 Long | 45.3 Yds/Punt | Led League in Long 2010 and 2020 (72, 72) | 1x Pro-Bowl (14)


The current punter for the Bengals is the best they've ever had. Huber has punted for over 44,000 yards and has a career long of 75 yards. He had the longest punt of the season in 2010 and 2020. He has averaged over 45 yards per punt and was named to the Pro-Bowl in 2014.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Pat McInally (1976-1985) | 29,307 Punt Yds | 67 Long | 41.9 Yds/Punt | Led League in Yds/Punt 1978 and 1981 (43.1, 45.4)

  2. Lee Johnson (1988-1998) | 32,196 Punt Yds | 70 Long | 43.2 Yds/Punt | Led League in Long 1990 (70)


Returner: Lemar Parrish (1970-1977)

1,201 Punt Rt Yds | 4 Punt Rt TD | 9.2 Yds/Punt Rt | 1,504 Kick Rt Yds | 1 Kick Rt TD | 24.7 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Punt TD 1970, 1972 and 1974 (1, 2, 1) | Led League in Yds/Punt Rt 1974 (18.8) | 6x Pro-Bowl (70, 71, 74, 75, 76, 77)


Lemar Parrish also makes the team as the returner. His five return touchdowns are the franchise record. He led the league in punt return touchdowns in three different seasons and also led the league in yards per punt return in 1974. He was a very consistent returner for eight seasons and a threat to take it to the house whenever he touched the ball.


Head Coach: Sam Wyche (1984-1991)

Regular Season: 61-66 | 48 W-L% | Playoffs: 3-2 | 1988 AFC Champion


The spot was a little hard to choose. Ultimately, I went with Sam Wyche. Wyche spent eight seasons with the Bengals, leading them to three winning seasons and two playoff appearances. He led the Bengals to the Super Bowl in 1988, where they fell short in the final minutes to Joe Montana. Forrest Gregg also led the Bengals to the Super Bowl, but he only spent four seasons in Cincinnati, two of which were winning seasons. Marvin Lewis is the best regular season coach in Bengals history, but I can't get over that 0-7 playoff record. If he could have managed even just one or two playoff wins, this spot may have been his. Paul Brown is obviously the All-Time Browns coach.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Paul Brown (1968-1975) | Regular Season: 55-56-1 | 49.5 W-L% | Playoffs: 0-3 | 1970 Coach of the Year | Hall of Fame Class 1967

  2. Forrest Gregg (1980-1983) | Regular Season: 32-25 | 56.1 W-L% | Playoffs: 2-2 | 1981 AFC Champion

  3. Marvin Lewis (2003-2018) | Regular Season: 131-122-3 | 51.8 W-L% | Playoffs: 0-7 | 2009 Coach of the Year

  4. Zac Taylor (2019-Present) | Regular Season: 16-32-1 | 33.7 W-L% | Playoffs: 3-1 | 2021 AFC Champion

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