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All-Time Teams: Miami Dolphins



Introduction

In my endless research of all things football and through my passion for the history of the NFL, I have decided to try and compile an All-Time Team for all 32 current NFL franchises. By All-Time Team I mean a starting roster compiled of the very best players to ever put on each franchise’s jersey. I will be starting in alphabetical order by current franchise location, so Arizona Cardinals all the way to The Washington Football Team, with the goal of releasing one to two All-Time teams a week for the duration of the current NFL season. This is meant to be fun and cause some debate and is based on my opinion after all my research and deep dives into each franchise’s history. Of course, not everyone will agree with who I chose, and I’d love to hear from anyone who agrees or disagrees, but first, let’s lay out some ground rules for how I came up with each team.


1. Each team roster will consist of the following:

Offense - 1 QB, 2 RB, 3 WR, 1 TE, 2 OT, 2 OG, 1 C

Defense - 2 DE, 2 DT, 3 LB, 2 CB, 2 S

Special Teams - 1 K, 1 P, 1 Returner

Coach - 1 Head Coach


2. I only considered an individual’s stats and contributions with each specific franchise. For example, Peyton Manning’s years with the Broncos were not considered when deciding on the starting QB of the Colts All-Time Team. As a result, the stats and awards listed with each individual player are only those that were achieved with that specific franchise.


3. A player cannot represent two teams as the starter. Players who spent time with more than one team were considered for the franchise they spent the most time with or had the most impact on. This rule led to some interesting scenarios that I will discuss in detail with each specific article to try and clear up any confusion.


4. A player’s stats and impact were considered in context with their era. This won’t simply be a listing of who passed or ran for the most yards in franchise history.


5. All stats are from Pro-Football-Reference and through the 2021 season. I will also be counting sacks from 1960, though the NFL doesn't officially count sacks until 1982.


6. Players in the "Honorable Mentions" section are ordered by year. It's not an indication of where I believe they rank in franchise history.


Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get to it!


Miami Dolphins All-Time Team


Franchise Information

First Season: 1966

Record: 476-385-4 (55.28 W-L%)

Playoff Record: 20-21

Super Bowls Won: 2 (1972 and 1973) (Lost in 1971, 1982 and 1984)

AFL Championships Won: 0

Passing Leader: Dan Marino 4,967/8,358 | 61,361 Yds | 420 TD

Rushing Leader: Larry Csonka 1,506 Att | 6,737 Yds | 53 TD

Receiving Leader: Mark Duper 511 Rec | 8,869 Yds | 59 TD

Sack Leader: Jason Taylor 131 Sk

Interception Leader: Jake Scott 35 Int

Scoring Leader: Olindo Mare 1,048 Points

Winningest Coach: Don Shula 257-133-2



QB: Dan Marino (1983-1999)

Record: 147-93 | 59.4 Cmp% | 61,361 Yds | 420 TD | 252 Int | 87 Rush Yds | 9 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1992 and 1997 (362, 336, 378, 354, 330, 319) | Led League in Yds 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988 and 1992 (5,084, 4,137, 4,746, 4,434, 4,116) | Led League in TD 1984, 1985 and 1986 (48, 30, 44) | Led League in Yds/A 1984 (9) | Led League in Yds/G 1984, 1986, 1988 and 1992 (317.8, 296.6, 277.1, 257.3) | Led League in Rate 1984 (108.9) | 9x Pro-Bowl (83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 91, 92, 94, 95) | 3x All-Pro (84, 85, 86) | 1984 MVP | 1984 Offensive Player of the Year | 1984 Bert Bell | 1994 Comeback Player of the Year | 1998 Walter Payton Man of the Year | 1984 AFC Champion | Hall of Fame Class 2005


Dan Marino is obviously the choice at quarterback for the Dolphins. He revolutionized the position and routinely produced seasons that would stand out even in today's pass happy league. His 1984 season is one of the greatest seasons by a quarterback ever. Marino threw for 5,084 yards and 48 touchdowns in 1984, these were both the most ever in a single season and stood until 2011 and 2004 respectively. To put this into even more perspective, the top 25 single seasons for passing yards in NFL history are all from this century and 22 of them are from 2010 or later. Marino was clearly ahead of his time. He led the league in completions six times, yards five times, touchdowns three times, yards per attempt once, yards per game four times and quarterback rating once. When he retired in 1999, he had completed more passes for more yards and more touchdowns than anyone else in NFL history. He currently ranks eighth in completions, seventh in yards and seventh in touchdowns. Marino was voted to nine Pro-Bowls and three All-Pro Teams and was also named the 1984 MVP, 1984 Offensive Player of the Year, 1994 Comeback Player of the Year and the 1998 Walter Payton Man of the Year. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2005. It's worth noting that Bob Griese was great during his years in Miami as well. Griese won two Super Bowls and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bob Griese (1967-1980) | Record: 92-56-3 | 56.2 Cmp% | 25,092 Yds | 192 TD | 172 Int | 994 Rush Yds | 7 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp% 1978 (63) | Led League in TD 1977 (22) | Led League in QB Rating 1977 (87.8) | 8x Pro-Bowl (67, 68, 70, 71, 73, 74, 77, 78) | 2x All-Pro (71, 77) | 1977 Bert Bell | 1972 and 1973 Super Bowl Champion | 1971 AFC Champion | Hall of Fame Class 1990

  2. Earl Morrall (1972-1976) | Record: 11-1 | 53.9 Cmp% | 2,335 Yds | 17 TD | 17 Int | 120 Rush Yds | 1 Rush TD | Led League in QB Rating 1972 (91) | 1x All-Pro (72) | 1972 Comeback Player of the Year | 1972 and 1973 Super Bowl Champion

  3. David Woodley (1980-1983) | Record: 21-12-1 | 52.9 Cmp% | 5,928 Yds | 34 TD | 42 Int | 771 Rush Yds | 9 Rush TD | 1982 AFC Champion

  4. Jay Fielder (2000-2004) | Record: 36-23 | 58.4 Cmp% | 11,040 Yds | 66 TD | 63 Int | 834 Rush Yds | 11 Int

  5. Ryan Tannehill (2012-2018) | Record: 42-46 | 62.6 Cmp% | 20,434 Yds | 123 TD | 75 Int | 1,210 Rush Yds | 6 Rush TD


RB: Larry Csonka (1968-1974, 1979)

4.5 Yds/A | 6,737 Yds | 53 TD | 91 Rec | 688 Rec Yds | 4 Rec TD | Led League in Yds/A 1971 (5.4) | 5x Pro-Bowl (70, 71, 72, 73, 74) | 2x All-Pro (71, 73) | 1979 Comeback Player of the Year | Hall of Fame Class 1987


Larry Csonka was one of the most powerful backs of all time. Csonka is still the franchise leader in rushing yards and touchdowns, even after some 40 plus years. He had three 1,000-yard seasons and was a key reason for three Super Bowl appearances and two Super Bowl victories, including the 1972 undefeated season. Csonka led the league in yards per attempt in 1971 and was voted to five straight Pro-Bowls from 1970-1974 and both the 1971 and 1973 All-Pro Teams. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.


RB: Ricky Williams (2002-2003, 2005, 2007-2010)

4.3 Yds/A | 6,436 Yds | 48 TD | 197 Rec | 1,431 Rec Yds | 6 Rec TD | Led League in Yds 2002 (1,853) | Led League in Yds/G 2002 (115.8) | 1x Pro-Bowl (02) | 1x All-Pro (02)


Ricky Williams is the other starting running back for the All-Time Dolphins team. Williams is an interesting case. He was traded to the Dolphins and had two spectacular seasons, but then he abruptly retired. Then he came back in 2005, but then violated league policy and was out of the league for a year again. Then he came back for three more seasons from 2007-2010. All that being said, when he was with the team, he was great. If it wasn't for the on again, off again career, he would have broken the franchise records in yards and touchdowns easily. Williams led the league in yards and yards per game in 2002 and in total had three 1,000-yard seasons in Miami. He was voted to the Pro-Bowl and All-Pro Team in 2002.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jim Kiick (1968-1974) | 3.7 Yds/A | 3,644 Yds | 28 TD | 221 Rec | 2,210 Rec Yds | 3 Rec TD | Led League in TD 1969 (9) | 2x Pro-Bowl (68, 69)

  2. Mercury Morris (1969-1975) | 5.1 Yds/A | 3,877 Yds | 29 TD | 46 Rec | 491 Rec Yds | 1 Rec TD | Led League in TD 1972 (12) | Led League in Yds/A 1973 (6.4) | Led League in Yds/Tch 1973 (6.6) | 3x Pro-Bowl (71, 72, 73)

  3. Delvin Williams (1978-1980) | 4.1 Yds/A | 2,632 Yds | 13 TD | 70 Rec | 574 Rec Yds | 1 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (78) | 1x All-Pro (78)

  4. Tony Nathan (1979-1987) | 4.8 Yds/A | 3,543 Yds | 16 TD | 383 Rec | 3,592 Rec Yds | 16 Rec TD | Led League in Yds/A 1981 (5.3) | Led League in Yds/Tch 1980 (7.8) | 1x All-Pro (79)

  5. Karim Abdul-Jabbar (1996-1999) | 3.4 Yds/A | 3,063 Yds | 33 TD | 77 Rec | 527 Rec Yds | 1 Rec TD | Led League in TD 1997 (15)

  6. Ronnie Brown (2005-2010) | 4.3 Yds/A | 4,815 Yds | 36 TD | 184 Rec | 1,491 Rec Yds | 2 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (08)


WR: Paul Warfield (1970-1974)

156 Rec | 3,355 Yds | 33 TD | Led League in TD 1971 (11) | 5x Pro-Bowl (70, 71, 72, 73, 74) | 2x All-Pro (71, 73) | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1983


Paul Warfield is first up at wide receiver. Warfield actually spent more seasons in Cleveland and was great with them as well, but there is no doubt he is more remembered for his great years in Miami. Warfield spent five seasons in Miami and was voted to the Pro-Bowl in all five of them. He was also named All-Pro in both 1971 and 1973. Warfields best season in Miami was 1971 when he led the league in touchdowns with 11. He was a key member of those great early 1970s Dolphins teams and named to the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team. Warfield was enshrined in Canton in 1983.


WR: Mark Clayton (1983-1992)

550 Rec | 8,643 Yds | 81 TD | Led League in TD 1984 and 1988 (18, 14) | Led League in RRTD 1984 (18) | 5x Pro-Bowl (84, 85, 86, 88, 91)


Mark Clayton is next up at wide receiver for the Dolphins. Clayton doesn't get the respect he deserves from Hall of Fame voters. He's at least a borderline Hall of Famer and led the league in touchdowns twice and combined rushing and receiving touchdowns once. Clayton was voted to five Pro-Bowls and had at least 1,000 yards in five different seasons. He also had at least 10 touchdowns in four seasons. Clayton was one half of the famous "Marks Brothers" and is much better than he seems to be remembered for.


WR: Mark Duper (1982-1992)

511 Rec | 8,869 Yds | 59 TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (83, 84, 86)


The third receiver is the other half of the "Marks Brothers", Mark Duper. Duper was great during his years in Miami as well. He's the franchise leader in receiving yards and had at least 1,000 yards in four seasons. Duper was voted to the Pro-Bowl in 1983, 1984 and 1986. Nat Moore was also great with Miami and is a close second for this spot.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Karl Noonan (1966-1971) | 136 Rec | 1,798 Yds | 17 TD | Led League in TD 1968 (11)

  2. Howard Twilley (1966-1976) | 212 Rec | 3,064 Yds | 23 TD

  3. Nat Moore (1974-1986) | 510 Rec | 7,546 Yds | 74 TD | Led League in TD 1977 (12) | 1x Pro-Bowl (77) | 1x All-Pro (77)

  4. Duriel Harris (1976-1983, 1985) | 269 Rec | 4,534 Yds | 18 TD

  5. Irving Fryar (1993-1995) | 199 Rec | 3,190 Yds | 20 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (93, 94)

  6. O.J. McDuffie (1993-2000) | 415 Rec | 5,074 Yds | 29 TD | Led League in Rec 1998 (90)

  7. Chris Chambers (2001-2007) | 405 Rec | 5,688 Yds | 43 TD | Led League in Yds/Rec 2001 (18.4) | 1x Pro-Bowl (05)

  8. Brandon Marshall (2010-2011) | 167 Rec | 2,228 Yds | 9 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (11)

  9. Jarvis Landry (2014-2017) | 570 Rec | 4,038 Yds | 22 TD | Led League in Rec 2017 (112) | 3x Pro-Bowl (15, 16, 17)


TE: Keith Jackson (1992-1994)

146 Rec | 1,880 Yds | 18 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (92)


Tight end is surprisingly pretty thin for the Dolphins. Keith Jackson spent his best seasons in Philadelphia, but the Eagles have a different starter for their All-Time Team, so that frees him up for the Dolphins. Jackson spent three seasons in Miami and had at least 594 yards and five touchdowns in all three. He was voted to the Pro-Bowl in 1992 and his best statistical season in Miami was 1994, when he had 673 yards and 7 touchdowns. Jackson gets the nod over other guys who spent more time with the team because he was easily the most dominant tight end the team has had.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jim Mandich (1970-1977) | 121 Rec | 1,406 Yds | 23 TD

  2. Bruce Hardy (1978-1989) | 256 Rec | 2,455 Yds | 25 TD

  3. Ferrell Edmunds (1988-1992) | 117 Rec | 1,612 Yds | 10 Rec TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (89, 90)

  4. Randy McMichael (2002-2006) | 283 Rec | 3,096 Yds | 18 TD


OT: Richmond Webb (1990-2000)

Started 163 of 164 Games | 7x Pro-Bowl (90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96) | 2x All-Pro (92, 94) | Hall of Fame All-1990s Team


First up on the offensive line, is should-be Hall of Famer, Richmond Webb. Webb started over 160 games with the Dolphins, including starting every game in seven seasons. He was voted to seven straight Pro-Bowls from 1990-1996 and the All-Pro Team in both 1992 and 1994. Webb was also named to the Hall of Fame All-1990s Team and should one day be inducted into the Hall of Fame.


OT: Jake Long (2008-2012)

Started 74 of 74 Games | 4x Pro-Bowl (08, 09, 10, 11) | 1x All-Pro (10)


Jake Long only spend five seasons in Miami, but he was one of the best offensive linemen in the league during that span. He started every game in three seasons and was voted to four Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Norm Evans (1966-1975) | Started 136 of 138 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (72, 74)

  2. Jon Giesler (1979-1989) | Started 105 of 126 Games

  3. Ronnie Lee (1979-1989) | Started 99 of 138 Games

  4. Wayne Moore (1970-1978) | Started 72 of 98 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (73)

  5. Vernon Carey (2004-2011) | Started 107 of 121 Games


OG: Larry Little (1969-1980)

152 of 159 Games | 5x Pro-Bowl (69, 71, 72, 73, 74) | 5x All-Pro (71, 72, 73, 74, 75) | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1993


Larry Little is first up at offensive guard. He started over 150 games, including starting every game in six seasons. Little was voted to five Pro-Bowls and five All-Pro Teams on his way to being named to the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team. He was a key member on the offensive line for the great Dolphins teams of the early 1970s and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993.


OG: Bob Kuechenberg (1970-1983)

Started 176 of 196 Games | 6x Pro-Bowl (74, 75, 77, 78, 82, 83) | 1x All-Pro (78)


Bob Kuechenberg is the nest great lineman from those championship winning Dolphins teams of the 1970s. Kuechenberg started over 175 games in Miami, including starting every game in seven seasons. He was voted to six Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. Kuechenberg is easily one of the best offensive linemen not already in the Hall of Fame. I assume voters are reluctant to add a third member of the early 1970s Dolphins offensive line into the Hall.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Ed Newman (1973-1984) | Started 113 of 167 Games | 4x Pro-Bowl (81, 82, 83, 84) | 1x All-Pro (84)

  2. Roy Foster (1982-1990) | Started 95 of 132 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (85, 86)

  3. Keith Sims (1990-1997) | Started 108 of 113 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (93, 94, 95)


C: Jim Langer (1970-1979)

Started 109 of 129 Games | 6x Pro-Bowl (73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78) | 3x All-Pro (74, 75, 77) | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1987


Jim Langer just edges out Dwight Stephenson for this spot. They were both great and one of the best centers of their eras. Langer gets the edge over Stephenson for starting every game in two more seasons. Langer was the anchor on the offensive line for the Super Bowl winning Dolphins teams of the 1970s. He started over 100 games with the Dolphins and was voted to six Pro-Bowls and three All-Pro Teams. Langer was named to the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team and inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Dwight Stephenson (1980-1987) | Started 87 of 114 Games | 5x Pro-Bowl (83, 84, 85, 86, 87) | 4x All-Pro (84, 85, 86, 87) | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team | 1985 Walter Payton Man of the Year | Hall of Fame Class 1998

  2. Tim Ruddy (1994-2003) | Started 140 of 156 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (00)

  3. Mike Pouncey (2011-2017) | Started 93 of 93 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (13, 14, 15)


DE: Jason Taylor (1997-2007, 2009)

8 Int | 43 FF | 27 FR | 131 Sk | 723 Tackles | 137 TFL | Led League in FF 2006 (9) | Led League in Sk 2002 (18.5) | 6x Pro-Bowl (00, 02, 04, 05, 06, 07) | 3x All-Pro (00, 02, 06) | 2006 Defensive Player of the Year | 2007 Walter Payton Man of the Year | Hall of Fame All-2000s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2017


First up on the defensive side of the ball is Jason Taylor. Taylor spent 12 seasons in Miami, racking up 43 forced fumbles and a franchise record 131 sacks. He had at least 10 sacks in six different seasons, including a league leading 18.5 in 2002. Taylor also led the league in forced fumbles in 2006. He was voted to six Pro-Bowls and three All-Pro Teams and was also named the 2006 Defensive Player of the Year and the 2007 Walter Payton Man of the Year. Taylor was named to the Hall of Fame All-2000s Team and inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.


DE: Cameron Wake (2009-2018)

1 Int | 22 FF | 2 FR | 98 Sk | 360 Tackles | 97 TFL | Led League in TFL 2010 (21) | 5x Pro-Bowl (10, 12, 13, 14, 16) | 1x All-Pro (12)


Cameron Wake was released by the Giants before ever playing a down of football in the NFL. He then went and tore up the Canadian Football League for two seasons before he was signed by the Miami Dolphins in 2009. His career totals would have been even more impressive had scouts noticed him coming right out of college. Wake was a 27-year-old rookie, but still managed to put together a Hall of Fame worthy career. He had five seasons of 10 or more sacks and led the league in tackles for loss in 2010. Wake was voted to five Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. Bill Stanfill was also great with the Dolphins and is a close second for this position.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bill Stanfill (1969-1976) | 2 Int | 8 FR | 69.5 Sk | Led League in Sk 1973 (18.5) | 5x Pro-Bowl (69, 71, 72, 73, 74) | 1x All-Pro (12)

  2. Vern Den Herder (1971-1982) | 1 Int | 14 FR | 65 Sk

  3. Doug Betters (1978-1987) | 6 FR | 64.5 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (83) | 1x All-Pro (83) | 1983 Defensive Player of the Year

  4. Jeff Cross (1988-1995) | 1 Int | 10 FF | 7 FR | 59.5 Sk | 377 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (90)

  5. Trace Armstrong (1995-2000) | 16 FF | 7 FR | 56.5 Sk | 190 Tackles | 22 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (00)


DT: Bob Baumhower (1977-1986)

1 Int | 16 FR | 39.5 Sk | 5x Pro-Bowl (79, 81, 82, 83, 84) | 1x All-Pro (83)


Bob Baumhower will man down one of the defensive tackle positions. He spent 10 seasons with the Dolphins from 1977-1986. Baumhower's 39.5 sacks are the most in franchise history by an interior lineman. He had a career high 9 sacks in 1981 and was voted to five Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team.


DT: Tim Bowens (1994-2004)

1 Int | 9 FF | 5 FR | 22 Sk | 414 Tackles | 26 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (98, 02) | 1994 Defensive Rookie of the Year


Tim Bowens played in over 150 games with the Dolphins from 1994-2004. He racked up 22 sacks and 414 tackles on his way to being named to the Pro-Bowl in both 1998 and 2002. Bowens was also named the 1994 Defensive Rookie of the Year.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Manny Fernandez (1968-1975) | 6 FR | 35 Sk

  2. Paul Soliai (2007-2013) | 2 FF | 2 FR | 4.5 Sk | 161 Tackles | 25 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (11)

  3. Randy Starks (2008-2014) | 4 Int | 1 FR | 4 FR | 30.5 Sk | 253 Tackles | 45 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (10, 12)


LB: Zach Thomas (1996-2007)

17 Int | 16 FF | 7 FR | 19.5 Sk | 1,640 Tackles | 70 TFL | Led League in Tackles 2002 and 2006 (156, 165) | 7x Pro-Bowl (99, 00, 01, 02, 03, 05, 06) | 5x All-Pro (98, 99, 02, 03, 06) | Hall of Fame All-2000s Team


First up at linebacker is the great Zach Thomas. Thomas is somehow not already in the Hall of Fame, but maybe this year will be the year he's finally inducted. Thoms intercepted 17 passes and racked up 19.5 sacks and 1,640 tackles during his 12 seasons in Miami. Thomas has the fifth most tackles in NFL history and led the league in tackles in both 2002 and 2006. He had at least 120 tackles in 10 seasons and at least 150 tackles in six seasons. Thomas was named to seven Pro-Bowls, five All-Pro Teams and the Hall of Fame All-2000s Team. Put this guy in the Hall of Fame already.


LB: John Offerdahl (1986-1993)

4 Int | 1 FR | 9.5 Sk | 5x Pro-Bowl (86, 87, 88, 89, 90) | 1x All-Pro (90)


John Offerdahl is next up at linebacker. He spent eight seasons in Miami, racking up four interceptions and 9.5 sacks. Offerdahl was voted to five straight Pro-Bowls from 1986-1990 and also named to the All-Pro Team in 1990. Offerdahl is a lesser-known name in NFL history, but he was clearly one of the best linebackers in the NFL in the late 1980s and early 1990s.


LB: Bryan Cox (1991-1995)

3 Int | 14 FF | 6 FR | 31.5 Sk | 529 Tackles | 3x Pro-Bowl (92, 94, 95)


Bryan Cox is another lesser-known linebacker in NFL history, but he was great during his five seasons in Miami. Cox compiled over 30 sacks and had a career high 14 sacks in 1992. He also had at least 100 tackles in four of his five seasons and was voted to three different Pro-Bowl teams. Nick Buoniconti would certainly be an All-Time Dolphin if it wasn't for the fact that he's already on the All-Time Patriots Team. While he spent the same number of years on both the Patriots and Dolphins, he clearly had his best years with the Patriots.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Nick Buoniconti (1969-1976) | 8 Int | 4 FR | 6 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (69, 72, 73) | 1x All-Pro (69) | Hall of Fame Class 2001

  2. Larry Gordon (1976-1982) | 8 Int | 10 FR | 17 Sk

  3. A.J. Duhe (1977-1984) | 3 Int | 6 FR | 38.5 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (84) | 1977 Defensive Rookie of the Year

  4. Kim Bokamper (1977-1985) | 6 Int | 3 FR | 40 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (79)

  5. Bob Brudzinski (1981-1989) | 5 Int | 6 FR | 14.5 Sk


CB: Sam Madison (1997-2005)

31 Int | 9 FF | 4 FR | 1 Sk | 366 Tackles | 14 TFL | Led League in Int 1999 (7) | 4x Pro-Bowl (99, 00, 01, 02) | 2x All-Pro (99, 00)


The first defensive back for the All-Time Dolphins is Sam Madison. Madison spent nine seasons in Miami and intercepted 31 passes, including leading the league in interceptions in 1999. He also racked up over 360 tackles and was voted to four Pro-Bowls and two All-Pro Teams.


CB: Xavien Howard (2016-Present)

27 Int | 4 FF | 3 FR | 2 Sk | 241 Tackles | 6 TFL | Led League in Int 2018 and 2020 (7, 10) | 3x Pro-Bowl (18, 20, 21) | 1x All-Pro (20)


Xavien Howard is currently on the Dolphins and is a starter here too. Howard has intercepted 27 passes in six seasons in Miami, including leading the league in 2018 and 2020. Howard has been named to three Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. He's well on his way to a great career and has consistently been one of the top cornerbacks in the league.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Dick Westmoreland (1966-1969) | 15 Int | Led League in Int 1967 (10) | 1x Pro-Bowl (67)

  2. Tim Foley (1970-1980) | 22 Int | 8 FR | 1x Pro-Bowl (79)

  3. William Judson (1982-1989) | 24 Int | 3 FR

  4. Terrell Buckley (1995-1999) | 24 Int | 6 FF | 10 FR | 1 Sk | 310 Tackles

  5. Patrick Surtain (1998-2004) | 29 Int | 4 FF | 5 FR | 6.5 Sk | 353 Tackles | 14 TFL | 3x Pro-Bowl (02, 03, 04) | 1x All-Pro (02)

  6. Brent Grimes (2013-2015) | 13 Int | 1 FF | 166 Tackles | 3x Pro-Bowl (13, 14, 15)


S: Jake Scott (1970-1975)

35 Int | 7 FR | 5x Pro-Bowl (71, 72, 73, 74, 75) | 2x All-Pro (73, 74)

Jake Scott's 35 interceptions are the most in Dolphin's history. Scott had at least four interceptions in all six of his seasons in Miami and had a career high eight interceptions in 1974. He was voted to five straight Pro-Bowls from 1971-1975 and two straight All-Pro Teams from 1973-1974. Scott has a real case for the Hall of Fame, but it appears he will never get the call.

S: Dick Anderson (1968-1977)

34 Int | 16 FR | 2 Sk | Led League in Int 1973 (8) | Led League in FR 1972 (5) | 3x Pro-Bowl (72, 73, 74) | 2x All-Pro (72, 73) | 1973 Defensive Player of the Year | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team


Jake Scott's teammate is also his teammate here. Dick Anderson intercepted 34 passes in his 10 seasons in Miami, including leading the league in 1973 with eight interceptions. Anderson was named to three straight Pro-Bowls from 1972-1974 and the All-Pro Team in 1972 and 1973. He was also named the 1973 Defensive Player of the Year and named to the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team. I'm convinced some of these players from the early 1970s Dolphins teams get overlooked by voters due to there already being a lot of players from those teams in the Hall. Regardless, I think Dick Anderson deserves a bust.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Glen Blackwood (1979-1987) | 29 Int | 14 FR | 4 Sk

  2. Louis Oliver (1989-1996) | 24 Int | 3 FF | 8 FR | 1 Sk | 481 Tackles

  3. Brock Marion (1998-2003) | 8 Int | 2 FF | 3 FR | 1 Sk | 290 Tackles | 3x Pro-Bowl (00, 02, 03)

  4. Yeremiah Bell (2004-2011) | 6 Int | 9 FF | 7 FR | 11 Sk | 562 Tackles | 15 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (09)

  5. Reshod Jones (2010-2019) | 21 Int | 3 FF | 7 FR | 10.5 Sk | 776 Tackles | 41 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (15, 17)


K: Garo Yepremian (1970-1978)

68.2 FG% | 54 Long | 830 Points | Led League in Points 1971 (117) | Led League in FG% 1970, 1975 and 1978 (75.9%, 81.3%, 82.6%) | 2x Pro-Bowl (73, 78) | 2x All-Pro (71, 73) | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team


Garo Yepremian may be best remembered for almost costing the Dolphins their perfect season when he picked up a blocked kick in the Super Bowl, attempted to pass the ball, but the ball slipped out of his hand and went backwards, and the Redskins scooped it up and scored. Thankfully the Dolphins still won, and we can look at Yepremian's whole career and clearly see he was one of the best kickers of his era. He made just under 70% of his field goals, led the league in points in 1971 and also led the league in field goal percentage three different times. Yepremian was voted to two Pro-Bowls, two All-Pro Teams and the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team. It's worth noting Olindo Mare is the franchise leader in points.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Pete Stoyanovich (1989-1995) | 79.3 FG% | 59 Long | 774 Points | Led League in Points 1992 (124) | Led League in FGM 1991 and 1992 (31, 30) | Led League in Long 1989 (59) | 1x All-Pro (92)

  2. Olindo Mare (1997-2006) | 80.9 FG% | 53 Long | 1,048 Points | Led League in FGM 1999 (39) | Led League in FG% 2001 (90.5%) | 1x Pro-Bowl (99) | 1x All-Pro (99)

  3. Dan Carpenter (2008-2012) | 81.9 FG% | 60 Long | 535 Points | Led League in Long 2010 (60) | 1x Pro-Bowl (09)


P: Reggie Roby (1983-1992)

24,036 Punt Yds | 77 Long | 43.3 Yds/Punt | Led League in Long 1986 and 1987 (73, 77) | Led League in Yds/Punt 1991 (45.7) | 2x Pro-Bowl (84, 89) | 1x All-Pro (84) | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team


The starting punter here is the great Reggie Roby. Roby spent 10 seasons in Miami and averaged 43.3 yards per punt. He led the league in yards per punt in 1991 and led the league in longest punt in both 1986 and 1987. Roby was named to two Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team and was also named to the Hall of Fame All-1980s Team.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Larry Seiple (1966-1977) | 25,347 Punt Yds | 73 Long | 40 Yds/Punt

  2. Brandon Fields (2007-2014) | 27,731 Yds | 74 Long | 46.8 Yds/Punt | Led League in Yds/Punt 2012 (50.2) | 1x Pro-Bowl (13)


Returner: Jakeem Grant (2016-2021)

978 Punt Rt Yds | 3 Punt Rt TD | 9.7 Yds/Punt Rt | 2,206 Kick Rt Yds | 2 Kick Rt TD | 24.8 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Punt Rt TD 2018 and 2020 (1, 1) | Led League in Kick Rt TD 2018 and 2019 (1, 1) | Led League in Kick Rt Long 2018 (102) | 1x Pro-Bowl (21)


This might be a surprise as Jakeem Grant isn't a household name, but he's been surprisingly great for the last six seasons. In his six seasons in Miami, Grant has racked up just under 1,000 punt return yards and three touchdowns as well has over 2,200 kick return yards and two touchdowns. He led the league in punt return touchdowns twice, kick return touchdowns twice and kick return long once as well. Grant was named to his lone Pro-Bowl in 2021.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Mercury Morris (1969-1975) | 171 Punt Rt Yds | 6.3 Yds/Punt Rt | 2,947 Kick Rt Yds | 3 Kick Rt TD | 26.5 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Kick Rt Yds 1969 (1,136) | Led League in Kick Rt TD 1969 (1) | Led League in Kick Rt Long 1969 (105) | 3x Pro-Bowl (71, 72, 73)

  2. O.J. McDuffie (1993-2000) | 1,127 Punt Rt Yds | 2 Punt Rt TD | 8.9 Yds/Punt Rt | 2,103 Kick Rt Yds | 22.9 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Punt Rt TD 1993 (2)


Head Coach: Don Shula (1970-1995)

Regular Season: 257-133-2 | 65.9 W-L% | Playoffs: 17-14 | 1972 and 1973 Super Bowl Champion | 1971, 1982 and 1984 AFC Champion | 1972 Coach of the Year | Hall of Fame Class 1997


No surprise here, Don Shula is one of the best coaches to ever to live. He led the Dolphins for 26 seasons, guiding them to a winning record in 20 of them. In all he only had two losing seasons in Miami. Shula took the Dolphins to 16 play-off appearances, five Super Bowl appearances and two Super Bowl victories. Shula won 328 total games during his career, and this is still the most ever. He was named the 1972 Coach of the Year and inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1997.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jimmy Johnson (1996-1999) | Regular Season: 36-28 | 56.3 W-L% | Playoffs: 2-3 | Hall of Fame Class 2020

  2. Dave Wannstedt (2000-2004) | Regular Season: 42-31 | 57.5 W-L% | Playoffs: 1-2

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