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All-Time Teams: Seattle Seahawks



Introduction

In my endless research of all things football and through my passion for the history of the NFL, I have decided to try and compile an All-Time Team for all 32 current NFL franchises. By All-Time Team I mean a starting roster compiled of the very best players to ever put on each franchise’s jersey. I will be starting in alphabetical order by current franchise location, so Arizona Cardinals all the way to The Washington Football Team, with the goal of releasing one to two All-Time teams a week for the duration of the current NFL season. This is meant to be fun and cause some debate and is based on my opinion after all my research and deep dives into each franchise’s history. Of course, not everyone will agree with who I chose, and I’d love to hear from anyone who agrees or disagrees, but first, let’s lay out some ground rules for how I came up with each team.


1. Each team roster will consist of the following:

Offense - 1 QB, 2 RB, 3 WR, 1 TE, 2 OT, 2 OG, 1 C

Defense - 2 DE, 2 DT, 3 LB, 2 CB, 2 S

Special Teams - 1 K, 1 P, 1 Returner

Coach - 1 Head Coach


2. I only considered an individual’s stats and contributions with each specific franchise. For example, Peyton Manning’s years with the Broncos were not considered when deciding on the starting QB of the Colts All-Time Team. As a result, the stats and awards listed with each individual player are only those that were achieved with that specific franchise.


3. A player cannot represent two teams as the starter. Players who spent time with more than one team were considered for the franchise they spent the most time with or had the most impact on. This rule led to some interesting scenarios that I will discuss in detail with each specific article to try and clear up any confusion.


4. A player’s stats and impact were considered in context with their era. This won’t simply be a listing of who passed or ran for the most yards in franchise history.


5. All stats are from Pro-Football-Reference and through the 2021 season. I will also be counting sacks from 1960, though the NFL doesn't officially count sacks until 1982.


6. Players in the "Honorable Mentions" section are ordered by year. It's not an indication of where I believe they rank in franchise history.


Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get to it!


Seattle Seahawks All-Time Team


Franchise Information

First Season: 1976

Record: 374-350-1 (51.66 W-L%)

Playoff Record: 17-18

Super Bowls Won: 1 (2013) (Lost in 2005 and 2014)

Passing Leader: Russell Wilson 3,079/4,735 | 37,059 Yds | 292 TD

Rushing Leader: Shaun Alexander 2,176 Att | 9,429 Yds | 100 TD

Receiving Leader: Steve Largent 819 Rec | 13,089 Yds | 100 TD

Sack Leader: Jacob Green 115.5 Sk

Interception Leader: Dave Brown 50 Int

Scoring Leader: Norm Johnson 810 Points

Winningest Coach: Pete Carroll 119-73-1


QB: Russell Wilson (2012-Present)

Record: 104-53-1 | 65.0 Cmp% | 37,059 Yds | 292 TD | 87 Int | 4,689 Rush Yds | 23 Rush TD | Led League in TD 2017 (34) | Led League in QB Rating 2015 (110.1) | Led League in Rush Yds/Attempt 2014 (7.2) | 8x Pro-Bowl (12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21) | 2020 Walter Payton Man of the Year | 2013 Super Bowl Champion | 2014 NFC Champion


Russell Wilson is easily the best quarterback in Seahawk's history. He's been with Seattle since 2012, guiding the team to nine straight winning seasons, eight playoff appearances, two NFC championships and a Super Bowl championship in 2013. Wilson already holds all franchise passing records and is one of the best running quarterbacks in NFL history, as he's rushed for over 4,600 yards. He led the league in touchdowns in 2013, quarterback rating in 2015 and rushing yards per attempt in 2014. Wilson has also already been named to eight Pro-Bowls and has a good shot to make the Hall of Fame once he becomes eligible.

Honorable Mentions

  1. Jim Zorn (1976-1984) | Record: 40-60 | 53.3 Cmp% | 20,122 Yds | 107 TD | 133 Int | 1,491 Rush Yds | 17 Rush TD

  2. Dave Krieg (1980-1991) | Record: 70-49 | 58.6 Cmp% | 26,132 Yds | 195 TD | 148 Int | 1,090 Rush Yds | 10 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp% 1991 (65.6%) | 3x Pro-Bowl (84, 88, 89)

  3. Warren Moon (1997-1998) | Record: 11-13 | 58.3 Cmp% | 5,310 Yds | 36 TD | 24 Int | 50 Rush Yds | 1 Rush TD | Led League in Yds/G 1997 (245.2) | 1x Pro-Bowl (97) | Hall of Fame Class 2006

  4. Matt Hasselbeck (2001-2010) | Record: 69-62 | 60.2 Cmp% | 29,434 Yds | 174 TD | 128 Int | 1,128 Rush Yds | 8 Rush TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (03, 05, 07) | 2005 NFC Champion

RB: Shaun Alexander (2000-2007)

4.3 Yds/A | 9,429 Yds | 100 TD | 214 Rec | 1,511 Rec Yds | 12 Rec TD | Led League in Yds 2005 (1,880) | Led League in TD 2001 and 2005 (14, 27) | Led League in Yds/G 2005 (117.5) | Led League in RRTD 2004 and 2005 (20, 28) | 3x Pro-Bowl (03, 04, 05) | 1x All-Pro (05) | 2005 MVP | 2005 Offensive Player of the Year | 2005 Bert Bell | Hall of Fame All-2000s Team

Shaun Alexander was one of the best running backs in the league during his eight years in Seattle. From 2001-2005, Alexander had no worse than 1,100 yards rushing and 14 touchdowns and averaged 1,500 yards and 17 touchdowns a season. His best season came in 2005 when he rushed for 1,880 yards and 27 touchdowns, both of which led the league. His 27 touchdowns were the most in a single season in NFL history at the time and currently ranks second all-time. Alexander was also named the 2005 MVP and Offensive Player of the Year. In all, Alexander led the league in yards once, touchdowns twice, yards per game once, and combined rushing and receiving touchdowns twice. He was named to three Pro-Bowls, one All-Pro Team and the Hall of Fame All-2000s Team. Alexander was injured following the 2005 season and was never quite the same, but he's more than worthy of a bust in Canton.


RB: Marshawn Lynch (2010-2015, 2019)

4.3 Yds/A | 6,381 Yds | 58 TD | 158 Rec | 1,309 Rec Yds | 8 Rec TD | Led League in TD 2013 and 2014 (12, 13) | Led League in RRTD 2014 (17) | 4x Pro-Bowl (11, 12, 13, 14) | 1x All-Pro (12) | Hall of Fame All-2010s Team

"Beast Mode" gets the other starting running back position for the All-Time Seahawks. Lynch had four 1,000-yard seasons and four seasons of at least 10 touchdowns. He led the league in touchdowns in both 2013 and 2014 and also led the league in combined rushing and receiving touchdowns in 2014. Lynch authored maybe the greatest run in NFL history against the Saints in the playoffs, rightfully coined the "Beast Quake". He was a key member of the franchise's best teams and was named to four Pro-Bowls, one All-Pro Team and the Hall of Fame All-2010s Team. Curt Warner and Chris Warren were also great running backs with the Seahawks.

Honorable Mentions

  1. Curt Warner (1983-1989) | 4.1 Yds/A | 6,705 Yds | 55 TD | 193 Rec | 1,467 Rec Yds | 7 Rec TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (83, 86, 87)

  2. John Williams (1986-1993) | 4.0 Yds/A | 4,579 Yds | 17 TD | 471 Rec | 4,151 Rec Yds | 16 Rec TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (90, 91)

  3. Chris Warren (1990-1997) | 4.3 Yds/A | 6,706 Yds | 44 TD | 194 Rec | 1,342 Rec Yds | 3 Rec TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (93, 94, 95)

  4. Mack Strong (1994-2007) | 4.0 Yds/A | 909 Yds | 5 TD | 218 Rec | 1,456 Rec Yds | 10 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (05, 06) | 1x All-Pro (05)

  5. Rickey Watters (1998-2001) | 4.0 Yds/A | 4,009 Yds | 22 TD | 166 Rec | 1,480 Rec Yds | 4 Rec TD

WR: Steve Largent (1976-1989)

819 Rec | 13,089 Yds | 100 TD | Led League in Yds 1979 and 1985 (1,237, 1,287) | Led League in Yds/G 1979 (82.5) | 7x Pro-Bowl (78, 79, 81, 84, 85, 86, 87) | 1x All-Pro (85) | 1988 Walter Payton Man of the Year | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1995

Steve Largent was the most prolific pass catcher in NFL history when he retired in 1989. His 819 receptions for 13,089 yards and 100 touchdowns were more than anyone else, ever. Largent had eight 1,000-yard seasons and three times had at least 10 touchdowns. He led the league in yards twice and yards per game once. Largent was named to seven Pro-Bowls, one All-Pro Team and the Hall of Fame All-1980s Team. He's one of the greatest receivers in NFL history and was rightfully inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1995.


WR: Doug Baldwin (2011-2018)

493 Rec | 6,563 Yds | 49 TD | Led League in TD 2015 (14) | Led League in RRTD 2015 (14) | 2x Pro-Bowl (16, 17)


Doug Baldwin was the key receiver for the Seahawks two Super Bowl runs. He was Russell Wilson's favorite target and had over 1,000 receiving yards twice. Baldwin led the league in touchdowns in 2015 with 14 and was voted to the Pro-Bowl in both 2016 and 2017.

WR: Brian Blades (1988-1998)

581 Rec | 7,620 Yds | 34 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (89)


I'm giving the final receiver spot to Brian Blades. Blades is second only to Largent in receiving yards in franchise history. He spent 11 seasons in Seattle and had at least 1,000 yards four times. Blades was surprisingly only voted to one Pro-Bowl, coming in 1989. Tyler Lockett and D.K. Metcalf may end up taking some of these spots if they continue on their current pace.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Daryl Turner (1984-1987) | 101 Rec | 1,872 Yds | 36 TD | Led League in TD 1985 (13)

  2. Joey Galloway (1995-1999) | 283 Rec | 4,457 Yds | 37 TD

  3. Darrell Jackson (2000-2006) | 441 Rec | 6,445 Yds | 47 TD

  4. Bobby Ingram (2001-2008) | 399 Rec | 4,859 Yds | 18 TD

  5. Tyler Lockett (2015-Present) | 449 Rec | 6,067 Yds | 45 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (15) | 1x All-Pro (15)

TE: John Carlson (2008-2010)

137 Rec | 1,519 Yds | 13 TD


Jimmy Graham is the best tight end the Seahawks have ever had, but he's already a starter on the All-Time Saints, so that leaves me with a tough decision. Tight end is an extremely thin position for Seattle, so I'm going with John Carlson. Carlson only spent three seasons with the Seahawks, but he put up numbers better than almost every other tight end in franchise history. His career high in yards came in 2008, when he racked up 627 yards and his career high of seven touchdowns came in 2009.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Christian Fauria (1995-2001) | 166 Rec | 1,683 Yds | 7 TD

  2. Itula Mili (1998-2006) | 164 Rec | 1,743 Yds | 13 TD

  3. Jimmy Graham (2015-2017) | 170 Rec | 2,048 Yds | 18 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (16, 17)

OT: Walter Jones (1997-2008)

Started 180 of 180 Games | 9x Pro-Bowl (99, 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08) | 4x All-Pro (01, 04, 05, 07) | Hall of Fame All-2000s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2014


Walter Jones is one of the greatest players in Seahawk's history. Jones spent his whole 12-year career in Seattle, starting every game in seven seasons. He was named to nine Pro-Bowls, four All-Pro Teams and the Hall of Fame All-2000s Team. Jones was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.


OT: Russell Okung (2010-2015)

Started 72 of 72 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (12)


I'm going with Russell Okung at the other starting offensive tackle position. Okung missed at least one game in every season with the Seahawks, but when he was healthy, he was great. Okung was voted to the Pro-Bowl in 2012 and won a Super Bowl in 2013.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Steve August (1977-1984) | Started 90 of 97 Games

  2. Duane Brown (2017-Present) | Started 70 of 70 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (17)

OG: Chris Gray (1998-2007)

Started 145 of 158 Games


Chris Gray gets the first interior lineman spot. Gray spent 10 seasons in Seattle and started every game in seven of them. He's started more games at guard than any other player in Seahawk's history. Although, Gray was never named to a Pro-Bowl or All-Pro Team.


OG: Edwin Bailey (1981-1991)

Started 120 of 139 Games


Edwin Bailey will man down the other offensive guard position. He spent 11 seasons in Seattle, starting every game in four seasons. Like Gray, Bailey was never named to a Pro-Bowl or All-Pro Team, but he was solid starter for a decade. Steve Hutchinson is truly the best guard in Seahawk's history, but he's a starter for the All-Time Vikings.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bryan Millard (1984-1991) | Started 99 of 121 Games

  2. Steve Hutchinson (2001-2005) | Started 68 of 68 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (03, 04, 05) | 2x All-Pro (03, 05) | Hall of Fame All-2000s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2020

C: Max Unger (2009-2014)

Started 67 of 67 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (12, 13) | 1x All-Pro (12)


Max Unger is the choice at center. He spent six seasons with the Seahawk's, including the team that won it all in 2013. Unger started every game in two seasons and was named to the 2012 and 2013 Pro-Bowl. He was also named to the 2012 All-Pro Team. Robbie Tobeck is a close second here.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Robbie Tobeck (2000-2006) | Started 88 of 92 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (05)

DE: Jacob Green (1980-1991)

3 Int | 17 FR | 115.5 Sk | 2x Pro-Bowl (86, 87)


First up on the defensive line is Jacob Green. Green is the franchise leader in sacks with 115.5. He had at least 10 sacks in six of his 12 years in Seattle, including a career high of 16 in 1983. Green was also named to the Pro-Bowl in both 1986 and 1987.


DE: Michael Sinclair (1992-2001)

25 FF | 9 FR | 73.5 Sk | 350 Tackles | 16 TFL | Led League in FF 1998 (6) | Led League in Sk 1998 (16.5) | 3x Pro-Bowl (96, 97, 98)


Michael Sinclair will man down the other side of this defensive line. He spent 10 seasons in Seattle and racked up over 70 sacks and 25 forced fumbles. Sinclair had over 10 sacks in three different seasons and led the league in sacks in 1998. He was named to the Pro-Bowl three straight times from 1996-1998. When I started this team, I was fully expecting to have Michael Bennett in one of these spots, but I can't justify having him in over Green or Sinclair.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jeff Bryant (1982-1993) | 1 Int | 11 FR | 63 Sk

  2. Patrick Kerney (2007-2009) | 1 Int | 10 FF | 1 FR | 24.5 Sk | 119 Tackles | 29 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (07) | 1x All-Pro (07)

  3. Michael Bennett (2013-2017) | 7 FF | 3 FR | 39 Sk | 195 Tackles | 69 TFL | 3x Pro-Bowl (15, 16, 17)

  4. Cliff Avril (2013-2017) | 14 FF | 2 FR | 34.5 Sk | 130 Tackles | 30 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (16)


DT: Cortez Kennedy (1990-2000)

3 Int | 11 FF | 6 FR | 58 Sk | 669 Tackles | 15 TFL | 8x Pro-Bowl (91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 98, 99) | 3x All-Pro (92, 93, 94) | 1992 Defensive Player of the Year | Hall of Fame All-1990s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2012


Cortez Kennedy is one of the greatest defensive tackles of all time. He spent 11 seasons in Seattle from 1990-2000 and racked up over 600 tackles and just under 60 sacks. Kennedy was the 1992 Defensive Player of the year and voted to eight Pro-Bowls, three All-Pro Teams and the Hall of Fame All-1990s Team. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.


DT: Joe Nash (1982-1996)

1 Int | 7 FR | 47.5 Sk | 779 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (84) | 1x All-Pro (84)


Joe Nash spent a whopping 15 seasons with the Seahawks, playing in over 200 games. He had multiple sacks in nine seasons and a career high nine sacks in 1985. Nash racked up just under 800 tackles and was named to the Pro-Bowl and All-Pro Team in 1984.


Honorable Mentions

  1. John Randle (2001-2003) | 4 FF | 2 FR | 23.5 Sk | 70 Tackles | 22 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (01) | Hall of Fame Class 2010

  2. Rocky Bernard (2002-2008) | 4 FF | 7 FR | 29 Sk | 283 Tackles | 53 TFL

  3. Brandon Mebane (2007-2015) | 2 FF | 4 FR | 15.5 Sk | 349 Tackles | 53 TFL

LB: Bobby Wagner (2012-Present)

11 Int | 6 FF | 10 FR | 23.5 Sk | 1,383 Tackles | 68 TFL | Led League in Tackles 2016 and 2019 (167, 159) | Led League in Solo Tackles 2017 (97) | 8x Pro-Bowl (14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21) | 6x All-Pro (14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20) | Hall of Fame All-2010s Team


Bobby Wagner is a lock for the Hall of Fame. He's been the unquestioned leader on defense for the Seahawks since 2012. Wagners had at least 100 tackles in all 10 of his seasons and led the league in tackles in both 2016 and 2019. He has over 1,300 tackles on his career and has already been voted to eight Pro-Bowls and six All-Pro Teams. Not surprisingly, he was also named to the Hall of Fame All-2010s Team. He'll certainly be a first ballot Hall of Famer whenever he decides to retire.


LB: Fredd Young (1984-1987)

1 Int | 5 FR | 19 Sk | 4x Pro-Bowl (84, 85, 86, 87) | 1x All-Pro (87)


Fredd Young was one of the best linebackers in the league for his four seasons in Seattle. This short of a career is usually not enough to land a starting spot on an all-time team, but Young was too good to leave him on the bench. He racked up just under 20 sacks from his inside linebacker position and was named to four straight Pro-Bowls from 1984-1987 and the 1987 All-Pro Team.

LB: Chad Brown (1997-2004)

3 Int | 10 FF | 13 FR | 48 Sk | 743 Tackles | 55 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (98, 99) | 1x All-Pro (98)


The final linebacker position goes to Chad Brown. Brown came to Seattle after four great seasons in Pittsburgh and continued to dominate. He had over 100 tackles in four seasons and racked up just under 50 sacks in a Seahawk's uniform. Brown also compiled just under 750 tackles and was named to the 1998 and 1999 Pro-Bowl. He was also named to the 1998 All-Pro Team. Rufus Porter, Lofa Tatupu and K.J. Wright were also all great with the Seahawks.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Keith Butler (1978-1987) | 8 Int | 6 FR | 11.5 Sk

  2. Michael Jackson (1979-1986) | 6 Int | 8 FR | 7 Sk

  3. Rufus Porter (1988-1994) | 3 Int | 1 FF | 5 FR | 37.5 Sk | 388 Tackles | 14 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (88, 89)

  4. Lofa Tatupu (2005-2010) | 10 Int | 7 FF | 2 FR | 8.5 Sk | 552 Tackles | 33 TFL | 3x Pro-Bowl (05, 06, 07) | 1x All-Pro (07)

  5. Julian Peterson (2006-2008) | 3 Int | 9 FF | 4 FR | 24.5 Sk | 249 Tackles | 29 TFL | 3x Pro-Bowl (06, 07, 08)

  6. K. J. Wright (2011-2020) | 6 Int | 11 FF | 9 FR | 13.5 Sk | 941 Tackles | 66 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (16)

CB: Richard Sherman (2011-2017)

32 Int | 5 FF | 5 FR | 1 Sk | 368 Tackles | 6 TFL | Led League in Int 2013 (8) | 4x Pro-Bowl (13, 14, 15, 16) | 3x All-Pro (12, 13, 14) | Hall of Fame All-2010s Team


Like Bobby Wagner, here's another likely Hall of Famer. Richard Sherman was clearly the best cornerback in the league for much of his time in Seattle. He intercepted over 30 passes during his seven seasons with the Seahawk's, including leading the league with eight picks in 2013. Sherman was named to four straight Pro-Bowls from 2013-2016 and three straight All-Pro Teams from 2012-2014. He was also rightfully named to the Hall of Fame All-2010s Team.


CB: Dave Brown (1976-1986)

50 Int | 12 FR | 1 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (84)


Dave Brown is surprisingly a little-known member of NFL history. He was a member of Seattle's inaugural season and went on to intercept a franchise record 50 passes. Brown had at least five interceptions in six different seasons and picked off a career high eight passes in 1984. He was named to his only Pro-Bowl in that same 1984 season.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Keith Simpson (1978-1985) | 19 Int | 7 FR | 10 Sk

  2. Patrick Hunter (1986-1994) | 12 Int | 2 FF | 5 FR | 1 Sk | 400 Tackles

  3. Shawn Springs (1997-2003) | 20 Int | 3 FF | 5 FR | 1.5 Sk | 375 Tackles | 9 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (98)

  4. Marcus Trufant (2003-2012) | 21 Int | 5 FF | 6 FR | 2 Sk | 646 Tackles | 13 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (07)

S: Kenny Easley (1981-1987)

32 Int | 11 FR | 8 Sk | Led League in Int 1984 (10) | 5x Pro-Bowl (82, 83, 84, 85, 87) | 3x All-Pro (83, 84, 85) | 1984 Defensive Player of the Year | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2017


Safety is the strongest position group for the Seahawks. First up is the great Kenny Easley. Easley spend seven seasons with the Seahawks and intercepted at least four passes in four different seasons. He led the league in interceptions in 1984 with a whopping 10 picks and thus was named the 1984 Defensive Player of the Year. Easley was also named to five Pro-Bowls, three All-Pro Teams and the Hall of Fame All-1980s Team. He was finally inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017.


S: Earl Thomas (2010-2018)

28 Int | 11 FF | 5 FR | 664 Tackles | 11 TFL | 6x Pro-Bowl (11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17) | 3x All-Pro (12, 13, 14) | Hall of Fame All-2010s Team


The other starting safety position goes to Earl Thomas. Thomas was arguably the best safety for 2010s decade and a key member of the defense that led the Seahawks to two Super Bowls. Thomas intercepted just under 30 passes during his nine seasons and was named to six Pro-Bowls and three All-Pro Teams. He was also named to the Hall of Fame All-2010s Team and has a decent shot at a bust in Canton once he becomes eligible. John Harris, Eugene Robinson and Kam Chancellor were all great with the Seahawks as well.


Honorable Mentions

  1. John Harris (1978-1985) | 41 Int | 11 FR | 3 Sk

  2. Eugene Robinson (1985-1995) | 42 Int | 10 FF | 15 FR | 5 Sk | 983 Tackles | Led League in Int 1993 (9) | 2x Pro-Bowl (92, 93)

  3. Robert Blackmon (1990-1996) | 15 Int | 6 FF | 8 FR | 6.5 Sk | 477 Tackles

  4. Kam Chancellor (2010-2017) | 12 Int | 9 FF | 3 FR | 2 Sk | 607 Tackles | 17 TFL | 4x Pro-Bowl (11, 13, 14, 15)

K: Norm Johnson (1982-1991)

69.7 FG% | 54 Long | 810 Points | 1x Pro-Bowl (84) | 1x All-Pro (84)

I'm going with Norm Johnson at kicker even though Steve Hauschka has a better field goal percentage. Johnson is the franchise record holder in points and spent 10 seasons with the team from 1982-1991. He was also named to both the Pro-Bowl and the All-Pro Team in 1984.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Steve Hauschka (2011-2016) | 88.8 FG% | 58 Long | 759 Points | Led League in Long 2014 (58)

P: Rick Tuten (1991-1997)

24,266 Punt Yds | 73 Long | 43.8 Yds/Punt | Led League in Punt Yds 1992 and 1993 (4,760, 4,007) | Led League in Long 1995 (73) | Led League in Yds/Punt 1995 (45) | 1x Pro-Bowl (94)

Rick Tuten gets the slight edge over John Ryan as the starter at punter for the Seahawks. Tuten averaged just under 44 yards per punt during his seven seasons in Seattle and led the league in punt yards twice, longest punt once and yards per punt once as well. He was named to his lone Pro-Bowl in 1994.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jon Ryan (2008-2017) | 34,480 Punt Yds | 77 Long | 44.8 Yds/Punt

  2. Michael Dickson (2018-Present) | 14,023 Punt Yds | 69 Long | 47.4 Yds/Punt | 1x Pro-Bowl (18) | 1x All-Pro (18)

Returner: Leon Washington (2010-2012)

1,069 Punt Rt Yds | 10.3 Yds/Punt Rt | 3,329 Kick Rt Yds | 4 Kick Rt TD | 26.2 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Kick Rt TD 2010 (3) | 1x Pro-Bowl (12)


This spot was a tough decision. Leon Washington, Nate Burleson and Tyler Lockett all have pretty food claims. I'm going with Leon Washington. He totaled over 4,000 return yards during just three seasons in Seattle. Washington also returned four kicks back for touchdowns, including a league leading three in 2010. He was also named to the Pro-Bowl in 2012.

Honorable Mentions

  1. Nate Burleson (2006-2009) | 1,288 Punt Rt Yds | 2 Punt Rt TD | 10.3 Yds/Punt Rt | 1,235 Kick Rt Yds | 1 Kick Rt TD | 22.9 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Punt Rt Yds 2007 (658) | Led League in Punt Rt Long 2006 and 2007 (90, 94)

  2. Tyler Lockett (2015-Present) | 1,071 Punt Rt Yds | 1 Punt Rt TD | 7.4 Yds/Punt Rt | 3,188 Kick Rt Yds | 2 Kick Rt TD | 25.1 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Kick Rt Yds 2017 (949) | Led League in Kick Rt TD 2017 (1) | 1x Pro-Bowl (15) | 1x All-Pro (15)


Head Coach: Pete Carroll (2010-Present)

Regular Season: 119-73-1 | 63.9 W-L% | Playoffs: 10-8 | 2013 Super Bowl Champion | 2014 NFC Champion


Seattle's current coach, Pete Carroll, is clearly the greatest the team has ever had. He's coached the Seahawk's for 12 seasons and has guided the team to nine winning seasons and eight playoff appearances. Carroll's also led the team to two Super Bowl appearances and the only championship in franchise history, coming in 2013. Chuck Knox and Mike Holmgren were also great coaches in Seattle and Holmgren guided them to a Super Bowl appearance in 2005.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jack Patera (1976-1982) | Regular Season: 35-59 | 37.2 W-L% | 1978 Coach of the Year

  2. Chuck Knox (1983-1991) | Regular Season: 80-63 | 55.9 W-L% | Playoffs: 3-4 | 1984 Coach of the Year

  3. Mike Holmgren (1998-2008) | Regular Season: 86-74 | 53.8 W-L% | Playoffs: 4-6 | 2005 NFC Champion


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