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All-Time Teams: Tennessee Titans



Introduction

In my endless research of all things football and through my passion for the history of the NFL, I have decided to try and compile an All-Time Team for all 32 current NFL franchises. By All-Time Team I mean a starting roster compiled of the very best players to ever put on each franchise’s jersey. I will be starting in alphabetical order by current franchise location, so Arizona Cardinals all the way to The Washington Football Team, with the goal of releasing one to two All-Time teams a week for the duration of the current NFL season. This is meant to be fun and cause some debate and is based on my opinion after all my research and deep dives into each franchise’s history. Of course, not everyone will agree with who I chose, and I’d love to hear from anyone who agrees or disagrees, but first, let’s lay out some ground rules for how I came up with each team.


1. Each team roster will consist of the following:

Offense - 1 QB, 2 RB, 3 WR, 1 TE, 2 OT, 2 OG, 1 C

Defense - 2 DE, 2 DT, 3 LB, 2 CB, 2 S

Special Teams - 1 K, 1 P, 1 Returner

Coach - 1 Head Coach


2. I only considered an individual’s stats and contributions with each specific franchise. For example, Peyton Manning’s years with the Broncos were not considered when deciding on the starting QB of the Colts All-Time Team. As a result, the stats and awards listed with each individual player are only those that were achieved with that specific franchise.


3. A player cannot represent two teams as the starter. Players who spent time with more than one team were considered for the franchise they spent the most time with or had the most impact on. This rule led to some interesting scenarios that I will discuss in detail with each specific article to try and clear up any confusion.


4. A player’s stats and impact were considered in context with their era. This won’t simply be a listing of who passed or ran for the most yards in franchise history.


5. All stats are from Pro-Football-Reference and through the 2021 season. I will also be counting sacks from 1960, though the NFL doesn't officially count sacks until 1982.


6. Players in the "Honorable Mentions" section are ordered by year. It's not an indication of where I believe they rank in franchise history.


Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get to it!


Tennessee Titans All-Time Team


Franchise Information

First Season: 1960

  1. Houston Oilers (1960-1996)

  2. Tennessee Oilers (1997-1998)

  3. Tennessee Titans (1999-Present)

Record: 463-480-6 (49.10 W-L%)

Playoff Record: 17-23

Super Bowls Won: 0 (Lost in 1999)

AFL Championships Won: 2 (1960 and 1961) (Lost in 1962)

Passing Leader: Warren Moon 2,632/4,546 | 33,685 Yds | 196 TD

Rushing Leader: Eddie George 2,733 Att | 10,009 Yds | 64 TD

Receiving Leader: Earnest Givins 542 Rec | 7,935 Yds | 46 TD

Sack Leader: Elvin Bethea 105 Sk

Interception Leader: Jim Norton 45 Int

Scoring Leader: Al Del Greco 1,060 Points

Winningest Coach: Jeff Fisher 142-120


QB: Warren Moon (1984-1993)

Record: 70-69 | 57.9 Cmp% | 33,685 Yds | 196 TD | 166 Int | 1,541 Rush Yds | 21 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp 1990 and 1991 (362, 404) | Led League in Yds 1990 and 1991 (4,689, 4,690) | Led League in TD 1990 (33) | Led League in Yds/G 1990 and 1991 (312.6, 293.1) | 6x Pro-Bowl (88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93) | 1989 Walter Payton Man of the Year | 1990 Offensive Player of the Year | Hall of Fame Class 2006


Warren Moon is clearly the choice at quarterback. When Moon graduated college in 1978, the NFL was still wary that a black quarterback could succeed in the NFL, so he signed with the Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League. Moon led the Eskimos to five Grey Cup Championships in six seasons and broke countless CFL passing records. Finally, at the age of 28, Moon was given a shot in the NFL. He proceeded to be one of the most prolific passers of all time. Moon led the Oilers to seven winning seasons and seven playoff appearances during his 10 seasons at the helm. He is the franchise record holder in all major passing categories and led the league in completions twice, yards twice, touchdowns once and yards per game twice as well. Moon was named to six Pro-Bowls with the Oilers and was also named the 1990 Offensive Player of the Year. At his retirement in 2000, Moon ranked third in completions, third in yards and fourth in touchdowns in NFL history. And remember, that's after he was forced to spend his first six professional years in the CFL. Now it's safe to assume that if he was in the NFL for those first six years, he wouldn't have put up the same exact numbers that he did in the CFL. But consider that if you add his totals from those six years in the CFL, Moon would have ranked first in completions by just under 400, first in yards by over 9,000 and first in touchdowns by 15 in NFL history at retirement. Moon was rightfully inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2006. It's also worth noting that George Blanda won two AFL Championships and an MVP award with the Oilers and Steve McNair has a Hall of Fame case as well.


Honorable Mentions

  1. George Blanda (1960-1966) | Record: 44-38 | 48.4 Cmp% | 19,149 Yds | 165 TD | 189 Int | 4 Rush TD | Led League in Cmp 1963, 1964 and 1965 (224, 262, 186) | Led League in Yds 1961 and 1963 (3,330, 3,003) | Led League in TD 1961 (36) | Led League in Yds/A 1961 (9.2) | Led League in Yds/G 1961 and 1963 (237.9, 214.5) | Led League in QB Rating 1961 (91.3) | 3x Pro-Bowl (61, 62, 63) | 1x All-Pro (61) | 1961 AFL MVP | 1960 and 1961 AFL Champion | 1962 AFL Championship Appearance | AFL All-1960s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1981

  2. Dan Pastorini (1971-1979) | Record: 53-54 | 51.5 Cmp% | 16,864 Yds | 96 TD | 139 Int | 656 Rush Yds | 8 Rush TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (75)

  3. Steve McNair (1995-2005) | Record: 76-55 | 59.5 Cmp% | 27,141 Yds | 156 TD | 103 Int | 3,439 Rush Yds | 36 Rush TD | Led League in Yds/A 2003 (8) | Led League in QB Rating 2003 (100.4) | Led League in Rush Yds/A 1997 (6.7) | 3x Pro-Bowl (00, 03, 05) | 2003 MVP | 1999 AFC Champion

  4. Vince Young (2006-2010) | Record: 30-17 | 57.9 Cmp% | 8,098 Yds | 42 TD | 42 Int | 1,380 Rush Yds | 12 Rush TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (06, 09) | 2006 Offensive Rookie of the Year

  5. Kerry Collins (2006-2010) | Record: 15-17 | 56.7 Cmp% | 6,804 Yds | 33 TD | 29 Int | 62 Rush Yds | 1 Rush TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (08)

  6. Ryan Tannehill (2019-Present) | Record: 30-13 | 67.3 Cmp% | 10,295 Yds | 76 TD | 27 Int | 721 Rush Yds | 18 Rush TD | Led League in Yds/A 2019 (9.6) | Led League in QB Rating 2019 (117.5) | 1x Pro-Bowl (19) | 2019 Comeback Player of the Year


RB: Earl Campbell (1978-1984)

4.3 Yds/A | 8,574 Yds | 73 TD | 115 Rec | 718 Rec Yds | Led League in Yds 1978, 1979 and 1980 (1,450, 1,697, 1,934) | Led League in TD 1979 and 1980 (19, 13) | Led League in Yds/G 1978, 1979 and 1980 (96.7, 106.1, 128.9) | Led League in YScm 1980 (1,981) | Led League in RRTD 1979 (19) | 5x Pro-Bowl (78, 79, 80, 81, 83) | 3x All-Pro (78, 79, 80) | 1979 MVP | 1978, 1979 and 1980 Offensive Player of the Year | 1978 Offensive Rookie of the Year | 1979 Bert Bell | Hall of fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1991


Earl Campbell is the easy choice at running back. Campbell is maybe the most powerful running back in NFL history. He ran for over 1,300 yards in five different seasons and led the league in yards three times, touchdowns twice, yards per game three times, yards from scrimmage once and combined rushing and receiving touchdowns once as well. Campbell was named to five Pro-Bowls, three All-Pro Teams and was named the 1979 MVP and the Offensive Player of the Year in three straight years coming in 1978, 1979 and 1980. He had over 10 rushing touchdowns in five seasons as well and was named to the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team. Campbell wasn't able to stay healthy following those seven years in Houston, but it's safe to assume if he were able to stay healthy, he'd have set every rushing record. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1991.


RB: Eddie George (1996-2003)

3.7 Yds/A | 10,009 Yds | 64 TD | 259 Rec | 2,144 Rec Yds | 10 Rec TD | 4x Pro-Bowl (97, 98, 99, 00) | 1x All-Pro (00) | 1996 Offensive Rookie of the Year


The second running back position was one of the hardest decisions I've had to make of all the All-Time Teams. Eddie George, Chris Johnson and Derrick Henry could all take this spot. After much deliberation, I decided on Eddie George. George had over 1,000 yards rushing in seven of his eight seasons with Tennessee/Houston and had 10 or more touchdowns in two seasons. He's also the franchise record holder in yards and touchdowns and was a key reason the team made their only Super Bowl appearance in 1999. George was named to four Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team and was also named the 1996 Offensive Rookie of the Year. He's been a semi-finalist for the Hall of Fame a few times and has a shot to be inducted one day. Chris Johnson famously ran for over 2,000 yards in 2009 and has a slight chance at the Hall of Fame as well, but George had a slightly longer peak than Johnson, so that's what gives him the edge for me. Derrick Henry may very well take this spot if he is able to stay healthy and continue on his current pace, but right now, two seasons as the best running back in the league aren't quite enough.

Honorable Mentions

  1. Billy Cannon (1960-1963) | 4.1 Yds/A | 2,111 Yds | 14 TD | 95 Rec | 1,263 Rec Yds | 20 Rec TD | Led League in Yds 1961 (948) | Led League in Yds/A 1961 (4.7) | Led League in Yds/G 1961 (67.7) | 1x Pro-Bowl (61) | 1x All-Pro (61)

  2. Dave Smith (1960-1964) | 4.2 Yds/A | 1,368 Yds | 11 TD | 80 Rec | 772 Rec Yds | 7 Rec TD | 1x All-Pro (60)

  3. Charley Tolar (1960-1966) | 3.6 Yds/A | 3,277 Yds | 21 TD | 175 Rec | 1,266 Rec Yds | 2 Rec TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (61, 62)

  4. Hoyle Granger (1966-1970, 1972) | 4.5 Yds/A | 3,514 Yds | 18 TD | 122 Rec | 1,287 Rec Yds | 5 Rec TD | Led League in YScm 1967 (1,494) | 2x Pro-Bowl (67, 68)

  5. Mike Rozier (1985-1990) | 3.8 Yds/A | 3,426 Yds | 27 TD | 80 Rec | 641 Rec Yds | 1 Rec TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (87, 88)

  6. Lorenzo White (1988-1994) | 4.1 Yds/A | 4,079 Yds | 29 TD | 184 Rec | 1,674 Rec Yds | 6 Rec TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (92)

  7. Chris Johnson (2008-2013) | 4.6 Yds/A | 7,965 Yds | 50 TD | 272 Rec | 2,003 Rec Yds | 8 Rec TD | Led League in Yds 2009 (2,006) | Led League in Yds/G 2009 (125.4) | Led League in YScm 2009 (2,509) | 3x Pro-Bowl (08, 09, 10) | 1x All-Pro (09) | 2009 Offensive Player of the Year

  8. Derrick Henry (2016-Present) | 4.9 Yds/A | 6,797 Yds | 65 TD | 94 Rec | 846 Rec Yds | 3 Rec TD | Led League in Yds 2019 and 2020 (1,540, 2,027) | Led League in TD 2019 and 2020 (16, 17) | Led League in Yds/G 2019 and 2020 (102.7, 126.7) | Led League in YScm 2020 (2,141) | 2x Pro-Bowl (19, 20) | 1x All-Pro (20) | 2020 Offensive Player of the Year

WR: Charley Hennigan (1960-1966)

410 Rec | 6,823 Yds | 51 TD | Led League in Rec 1964 (101) | Led League in Yds 1961 and 1964 (1,746, 1,546) | Led League in Yds/G 1961 and 1964 (124.7, 110.4) | Led League in Y/Tch 1964 (15.3) | Led League in YScm 1961 and 1964 (1,746, 1,546) | 5x Pro-Bowl (61, 62, 63, 64, 65) | 3x All-Pro (61, 62, 64) | AFL All-1960s Team


Charley Hennigan is the clear number one receiver for the Titans/Oilers. He has a case for the Hall of Fame, although it doesn't look like he'll ever make it. Hennigan led the league in receptions once, yards twice, yards per game twice, yards per touch once and yards from scrimmage twice. His 1,746 yards in 1961 were the most in a single season ever at the time. Hennigan won two AFL Championships with the Oilers and was also named to the Pro-Bowl five times, the All-Pro Team three times and the AFL All-1960s Team.

WR: Drew Hill (1985-1991)

480 Rec | 7,477 Yds | 47 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (88, 90)


Next up at receiver is Drew Hill. Hill spent seven seasons in Houston and was one of Warren Moon's favorite targets. He had over 1,000 yards in five of his seven seasons, including a career high 1,169 yards in 1985. Hill also had 10 touchdowns in 1988 and was voted to the Pro-Bowl in both in 1988 and 1990.

WR: Haywood Jeffires (1987-1995)


515 Rec | 6,119 Yds | 47 TD | Led League in Rec 1991 (100) | Led League in Y/Tch 1991 (11.8) | 3x Pro-Bowl (91, 92, 93) | 1x All-Pro (91)

I gave the final receiver position to Haywood Jeffires which means I'm leaving the franchise leader yards, Earnest Givins, off the team. Jeffires put up over 1,000 yards in two seasons and led the league in receptions and yards per touch in 1991. He was also named to the Pro-Bowl in three straight seasons from 1991-1993 and the 1991 All-Pro Team.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bill Groman (1960-1962) | 143 Rec | 2,976 Yds | 32 TD | Led League in Yds 1960 (1,473) | Led League in Yds/Rec 1960 and 1961 (20.5, 23.5) | Led League in TD 1961 (17) | Led League in Yds/G 1960 (105.2) | Led League in YScm 1960 (1,473) | Led League in RRTD 1961 (18) | 1x All-Pro (61)

  2. Charley Frazier (1962-1968) | 179 Rec | 3,060 Yds | 22 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (66)

  3. Ken Burrough (1972-1981) | 408 Rec | 6,906 Yds | 47 TD | Led League in Yds 1975 (1,063) | Led League in Yds/G 1975 (75.0) | 2x Pro-Bowl (75, 77)

  4. Drew Hill (1985-1991) | 480 Rec | 7,477 Yds | 47 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (88, 90)

  5. Earnest Givins (1986-1994) | 542 Rec | 7,935 Yds | 46 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (90, 92)

  6. Curtis Duncan (1987-1993) | 322 Rec | 3,935 Yds | 20 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (92)

  7. Derrick Mason (1997-2004) | 453 Rec | 6,114 Yds | 37 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (00, 03) | 1x All-Pro (00)

  8. Nate Washington (2009-2014) | 307 Rec | 4,591 Yds | 28 TD

TE: Delanie Walker (2013-2019)

381 Rec | 4,423 Yds | 28 TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (15, 16, 17)

Delanie Walker was somewhat overlooked during his seven seasons in Tennessee, but he was consistently one of the best tight ends in the league. He had over 800 yards receiving in four seasons and even crossed the 1,000-yard mark in 2015. Walker had at least six touchdowns in three seasons and was voted to three straight Pro-Bowls from 2015-2017. Frank Wycheck was a very close second for this spot and he had a little longer career with the Titans, but Walker was much more dominant during his career.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bob McLeod (1961-1966) | 126 Rec | 1,926 Yds | 19 TD | 1x Pro-Bowl (61)

  2. Alvin Reed (1967-1972) | 199 Rec | 2,818 Yds | 11 TD | 2x Pro-Bowl (68, 69)

  3. Frank Wycheck (1995-2003) | 482 Rec | 4,958 Yds | 27 TD | 3x Pro-Bowl (98, 99, 00)


OT: Brad Hopkins (1993-2005)

Started 188 of 194 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (00, 03)


First up on the offensive line is Brad Hopkins. Hopkins started over 180 games with the Titans and Oilers, starting every game in five different seasons. Nobody has started more games at offensive tackle in a Titans or Oilers uniform than Hopkins. He was also a key member on the line that made the Super Bowl in 1999 and was named to the Pro-Bowl in both 2000 and 2003.


OT: Michael Roos (2005-2014)

Started 148 of 148 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (08) | 1x All-Pro (08)

I gave Michael Roos the second offensive tackle position. Al Jamison and Leon Gray were more dominant, but they only played three seasons a piece with the franchise. Taylor Lewan has been great when he's been able to stay healthy, but he's only been able to do that for two full seasons. Walt Suggs is the closet to taking this spot, but I gave the slight edge to Roos since he started more games. Roos started 148 total games, including starting every game in eight different seasons. He was named to both the Pro-Bowl and All-Pro Team in 2008.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Al Jamison (1960-1962) | Started 42 of 42 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (61, 62) | 3x All-Pro (60, 61, 62)

  2. Rich Michael (1960-1966) | Started 65 of 80 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (62, 63)

  3. Walt Suggs (1961-1971) | Started 122 of 137 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (67, 68)

  4. Glen Ray Hines (1966-1970) | Started 64 of 70 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (68, 69)

  5. Leon Gray (1979-1981) | Started 46 of 46 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (79, 81) | 2x All-Pro (79, 80)

  6. David Stewart (2006-2013) | Started 116 of 116 Games

  7. Taylor Lewan (2014-Present) | Started 85 of 90 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (16, 17, 18)

  8. Jack Conklin (2016-2019) | Started 57 of 57 Games | 1x All-Pro (16)

OG: Bruce Matthews (1983-2001)

Started 293 of 296 Games | 14x Pro-Bowl (88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 00, 01) | 7x All-Pro (88, 89, 90, 92, 98, 99, 00) | Hall of Fame All-1990s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2007


If I had to pick one man as the greatest offensive lineman of all-time, I'd choose Bruce Matthews. Matthews played literally every single position on the offensive line during his 19 seasons. He spent two seasons primarily as a tackle, 11 seasons primarily as a guard and six seasons primarily as a center. Matthews started every single game in 17 seasons and at one point started 224 straight games. He was named to an absurd 14 straight Pro-Bowls from 1988-2001 and seven different All-Pro Teams. Matthews was also named to the Hall of Fame All-1990s Team and of course inducted into the Hall of Fame on his first ballot in 2007.

OG: Mike Munchak (1982-1993)

Started 156 of 159 Games | 9x Pro-Bowl (84, 85, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93) | 2x All-Pro (87, 91) | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2001

For 11 seasons, Mike Munchak and Bruce Matthews were teammates in Houston, and they're teammates here as well. They combined to make one of the best offensive line duos of all-time. Munchak started over 150 games from 1982-1993, including starting every game in six seasons. He was named to nine Pro-Bowls, two All-Pro Teams and the Hall of Fame All-1980s Team. Munchak was also inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2001. Bob Talamini is a huge Hall of Fame snub in my opinion and would be a starter on many other All-Time Teams.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bob Talamini (1960-1967) | Started 106 of 112 Games | 6x Pro-Bowl (62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67) | 3x All-Pro (63, 65, 67) | AFL All-1960s Team

  2. Sonny Bishop (1964-1969) | Started 78 of 82 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (68)

  3. Ed Fisher (1974-1982) | Started 101 of 126 Games

  4. Benji Olson (1998-2007) | Started 140 of 152 Games

C: Kevin Mawae (2006-2009)

Started 61 of 61 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (08, 09) | 1x All-Pro (08) | Hall of Fame All-2000s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2019

The Titans don't really have a clear center who spent a long time with the team. Thankfully Nick Mangold is the Jet's All-Time center, so that frees up Kevin Mawae for this spot. He only spent four seasons in Tennessee at the end of his career, but he started every game in two of them and was named to the Pro-Bowl in 2008 and 2009 and the All-Pro Team in 2008. Mawae was also named to the Hall of Fame All-2000s Team and inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2019. Like Mawae, Mark Stepnoski spent four seasons with the team and is close second for the starting role.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Bob Schmidt (1961-1963) | Started 40 of 40 Games | 3x Pro-Bowl (61, 62, 63)

  2. Bobby Maples (1965-1970) | Started 72 of 83 Games | 1x Pro-Bowl (68)

  3. Carl Mauck (1975-1981) | Started 94 of 104 Games

  4. Mark Stepnoski (1995-1998) | Started 61 of 61 Games | 2x Pro-Bowl (95, 96) | Hall of Fame All-1990s Team


DE: Elvin Bethea (1968-1983)

16 FR | 105 Sk | 8x Pro-Bowl (69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 78, 79) | Hall of Fame Class 2003


Elvin Bethea is first up on the defensive side of the ball. He spent a whopping 16 seasons in Houston and had at least 10 sacks in six of them. Bethea's 105 sacks are still the franchise record. He was named to eight Pro-Bowls and finally inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003.


DE: Jevon Kearse (1999-2003, 2008-2009)

1 Int | 22 FF | 2 FR | 52 Sk | 231 Tackles | 56 TFL | Led League in FF 1999 (8) | 3x Pro-Bowl (99, 00, 01) | 1x All-Pro (99) | 1999 Defensive Rookie of the Year


Jevon Kearse had maybe the most dominant start to a career of any defensive lineman in NFL history. "The Freak" had at least 10 sacks in his first three seasons and led the league in forced fumbles in his rookie season. He was named to three straight Pro-Bowls from 1999-2001 and the 1999 All-Pro Team. Kearse was also named the 1999 Defensive Rookie of the Year. His production fell off a little later in his career, but when he was at his best, there were few who could stop him.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Don Floyd (1960-1967) | 4 Int | 20.5 Sk | 2x Pro-Bowl (61, 62) | 1x All-Pro (62)

  2. Pat Holmes (1966-1972) | 6 FR | 30 Sk | 2x Pro-Bowl (67, 68) | 1x All-Pro (67)

  3. Jesse Baker (1979-1987) | 5 FR | 66 Sk

  4. William Fuller (1986-1993) | 1 Int | 7 FF | 5 FR | 59 Sk | 335 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (91)

  5. Sean Jones (1988-1993) | 1 Int | 5 FF | 5 FR | 57.5 Sk | 295 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (93)

  6. Kyle Vanden Bosch (2005-2009) | 14 FF | 3 FR | 38.5 Sk | 270 Tackles | 47 TFL | 3x Pro-Bowl (05, 07, 09)

  7. Derrick Morgan (2010-2018) | 5 FF | 5 FR | 44.5 Sk | 306 Tackles | 54 TFL

  8. Jurrell Casey (2011-2019) | 8 FF | 5 FR | 51 Sk | 493 Tackles | 84 TFL | 5x Pro-Bowl (15, 16, 17, 18, 19)

DT: Curley Culp (1974-1980)

1 Int | 8 FR | 31.5 Sk | 4x Pro-Bowl (75, 76, 77, 78) | 1x All-Pro (75) | Hall of Fame Class 2013

Curley Culp is maybe remembered more for his time with the Chiefs, since he won the Super Bowl with them in 1968, but he actually played more games and was voted to more Pro-Bowls and All-Pro Teams with Houston. During his seven seasons in Houston, Culp recked up over 30 sacks, including a career high 11.5 in 1975. Culp was also named to four straight Pro-Bowls from 1975-1978 and the 1975 All-Pro Team. He was finally inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2013.


DT: Ray Childress (1985-1995)

19 FF | 19 FR | 75.5 Sk | 884 Tackles | 5x Pro-Bowl (88, 90, 91, 92, 93) | 1x All-Pro (92)

Ray Childress is a huge Hall of Fame snub. He spent 11 seasons with the Houston Oilers from 1985-1995 and racked up over 75 sacks. Childress had at least eight sacks in five seasons and had a career high 13 sacks in 1992. He twice had over 100 tackles in a single season and was also named to five Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. At the very least, he deserves some attention from Hall of Fame voters.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Ed Husmann (1961-1965) | 32 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (61, 62, 63) | 1x All-Pro (62)

  2. Doug Smith (1985-1992) | 1 Int | 5 FR | 14 Sk

  3. Henry Ford (1994-2002) | 2 FF | 6 FR | 24 Sk | 272 Tackles | 23 TFL

  4. Albert Haynesworth (2002-2008) | 6 FF | 4 FR | 24 Sk | 272 Tackles | 60 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (07, 08) | 2x All-Pro (07, 08)

LB: Robert Brazile (1975-1984)

13 Int | 14 FR | 48 Sk | 7x Pro-Bowl (76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82) | 2x All-Pro (78, 79) | 1975 Defensive Rookie of the Year | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame Class 2018

Robert Brazile is the obvious first choice at linebacker. He spent 10 seasons with the Oilers from 1975-1984 and compiled over 10 interceptions and over 45 sacks. Brazile had at least five sacks in seven seasons and was voted to seven straight Pro-Bowls from 1976-1982. He was also named to the 1978 and 1979 All-Pro Team and the Hall of Fame All-1970s Team. Brazile finally got a bust in Canton in 2018.


LB: Keith Bulluck (2000-2009)

19 Int | 15 FF | 12 FR | 18 Sk | 1,078 Tackles | 61 TFL | Led League in Tackles 2004 (152) | 1x Pro-Bowl (03) | 1x All-Pro (03)

Keith Bullock gets the next linebacker position. He spent 10 seasons with the Titans and compiled just under 20 interceptions and just under 20 sacks. Bulluck had at least 100 tackles in six different seasons and led the league in tackles in 2004 with 152. He was surprisingly only named to one Pro-Bowl and one All-Pro Team, both coming in 2003.


LB: George Webster (1967-1972)

4 Int | 4 FR | 8.5 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (67, 68, 69) | 3x All-Pro (67, 68, 69) | AFL All-1960s Team


George Webster gets the final linebacker spot. It was a pretty close call between him and Al Smith, but Webster was more dominant during his six years in Houston. He was named to three straight Pro-Bowls and All-Pro Teams from 1967-1969 and was also named to the AFL All-1960s Team. Even though he only spent six years with the franchise, it's hard to overlook his dominance.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Doug Cline (1960-1966) | 7 Int | 11 Sk

  2. Garland Boyette (1966-1972) | 2 Int | 6 FR | 5.5 Sk | 2x Pro-Bowl (68, 69)

  3. Ted Washington (1973-1982) | 7 Int | 9 FR | 45 Sk

  4. Greg Bingham (1973-1984) | 21 Int | 14 FR | 14.5 Sk

  5. John Grimsley (1984-1990) | 1 Int | 9 FR | 2 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (88)

  6. Johnny Meads (1984-1992) | 1 Int | 2 FR | 23.5 Sk

  7. Al Smith (1987-1996) | 2 Int | 8 FF | 5 FR | 5.5 Sk | 880 Tackles | 2x Pro-Bowl (91, 92) | 1x All-Pro (92)

  8. Joe Bowden (1992-1999) | 3 Int | 9 FF | 8 FR | 12.5 Sk | 413 Tackles

  9. Eddie Robinson (1992-1995, 1998-2001) | 4 Int | 6 FF | 9 FR | 20 Sk | 560 Tackles


CB: Cris Dishman (1988-1996)

31 Int | 11 FF | 12 FR | 485 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (91) | 1x All-Pro (91)


Cris Dishman gets the starting role at cornerback for the All-Time Titans. He spent nine seasons with the franchise and intercepted over 30 passes. Dishman had at least four interceptions in five different seasons, including a career high six interceptions in 1991 and 1993. He was named to his only Pro-Bowl and All-Pro Team with the team in 1991.


CB: Tony Banfield (1960-1965)

27 Int | 1 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (61, 62, 63) | 3x All-Pro (61, 62, 63)


I'm going back to the beginning of the franchise for this pick. Tony Banfield only spent five seasons with Houston, but he had over six interceptions in three of them. He was a key member of two championship winning teams and was named to three straight Pro-Bowls and All-Pro Teams from 1961-1963. Samari Rolle and Miller Farr were also both great with the Titans/Oilers and I almost went with Rolle. Rolle's 2000 season was outstanding, but Banfield was a top corner in the league for more seasons.

Honorable Mentions

  1. Mark Johnston (1960-1963) | 13 Int | 1x Pro-Bowl (61) | 1x All-Pro (60)

  2. W.K. Hicks (1964-1969) | 27 Int | 1 FR | Led League in Int 1965 (9) | 1x Pro-Bowl (66)

  3. Miller Farr (1967-1969) | 19 Int | 1 FR | Led League in Int 1967 (10) | 3x Pro-Bowl (67, 68, 69) | 2x All-Pro (67, 68) | AFL All-1960s Team

  4. Zeke Moore (1967-1977) | 24 Int | 8 FR | 1 Sk | 2x Pro-Bowl (69, 70)

  5. Willie Alexander (1971-1979) | 23 Int | 4 FR | 1 Sk

  6. Greg Stemrick (1975-1982) | 14 Int | 6 FR | 1x Pro-Bowl (80)

  7. Steve Brown (1983-1990) | 18 Int | 3 FR | 5 Sk

  8. Darryll Lewis (1991-1998) | 27 Int | 5 FF | 5 FR | 4 Sk | 394 Tackles | 1x Pro-Bowl (95)

  9. Cortland Finnegan (2006-2011) | 14 Int | 3 FF | 4 FR | 6 Sk | 472 Tackles | 19 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (08) | 1x All-Pro (08)

  10. Samari Rolle (1998-2004) | 23 Int | 1 FF | 8 FR | 8.5 Sk | 297 Tackles | 9 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (00) | 1x All-Pro (00)

  11. Jason McCorty (2009-2016) | 13 Int | 6 FF | 5 FR | 1 Sk | 506 Tackles | 12 TFL

S: Jim Norton (1960-1968)

45 Int | 3 FR | 1 Sk | 3x Pro-Bowl (62, 63, 67)

Jim Norton is the franchise record holder in interceptions with 45. He was with the team's inaugural season and won two AFL Championships. Norton picked off at least six passes in five separate seasons and picked off a career high nine passes in 1961. He was named to the Pro-Bowl in 1962, 1963 and 1967.


S: Kevin Byard (2016-Present)

23 Int | 3 FF | 3 FR | 4 Sk | 519 Tackles | 15 TFL | Led League in Int 2017 (8) | 2x Pro-Bowl (17, 21) | 2x All-Pro (17, 21)

This final spot could have been Ken Houston's, but he's a starter for the All-Time Washington team. That leaves a whole bunch of other guys with decent claims to this spot. I'm going with Kevin Byard. Byard has consistently been one of the best safeties in the league since being drafted in 2016. He's already intercepted over 20 passes and even led the league in interceptions in 2017 with eight. Byard has also already been named to two Pro-Bowls and two All-Pro Teams.

Honorable Mentions

  1. Fred Glick (1961-1966) | 30 Int | 6.5 Sk | Led League in Int 1963 (12) | 3x Pro-Bowl (62, 63, 64) | 1x All-Pro (63)

  2. Ken Houston (1967-1972) | 25 Int | 11 FR | 5x Pro-Bowl (68, 69, 70, 71, 72) | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1986

  3. Mike Reinfeldt (1976-1983) | 26 Int | 11 FR | 2 Sk | Led League in Int 1979 (12) | 1x Pro-Bowl (79) | 1x All-Pro (79)

  4. Keith Bostic (1983-1988) | 13 Int | 7 FR | 17 Sk | 1x Pro-Bowl (87)

  5. Marcus Robertson (1991-2000) | 22 Int | 9 FF | 9 FR | 1.5 Sk | 643 Tackles | 1x All-Pro (93)

  6. Blaine Bishop (1993-2001) | 5 Int | 12 FF | 11 FR | 13.5 Sk | 697 Tackles | 13 TFL | 4x Pro-Bowl (95, 96, 97, 00)

  7. Chris Hope (2006-2011) | 16 Int | 2 FF | 5 FR | 4 Sk | 455 Tackles | 16 TFL | 1x Pro-Bowl (08)

  8. Michael Griffin (2007-2015) | 25 Int | 11 FF | 6 FR | 7 Sk | 773 Tackles | 27 TFL | 2x Pro-Bowl (08, 10)

K: Al Del Greco (1991-2000)

83.4 FG% | 56 Long | 1,060 Points | Led League in FGM 1998 (36) | Led League in Long 1992 and 1996 (54, 56)

Al Del Greco gets the nod at kicker. He's the franchise record holder in points with 1,060 and he led the league in field goals made once and longest field goal twice. Del Greco was also a member of the team that appeared in the Super Bowl in 1999. George Blanda was one of the better kickers of his time, but I can't look past his 48.1 field goal percentage. If Rob Bironas would have just played one or two more seasons, I probably would have gone with him.


Honorable Mentions

  1. George Blanda (1960-1966) | 48.1 FG% | 55 Long | 598 Points | Led League in Long 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1966 (53, 54, 54, 51) | Led League in FG% 1961 (61.5%) | 3x Pro-Bowl (61, 62, 63) | 1x All-Pro (61) | 1961 AFL MVP | AFL All-1960s Team | Hall of Fame Class 1981

  2. Toni Fritsch (1977-1981) | 77.1 FG% | 51 Long | 392 Points | Led League in FG% 1977, 1979 and 1980 (75%, 84%, 79.2%) | 1x Pro-Bowl (79) | 1x All-Pro (79)

  3. Rob Bironas (2005-2013) | 85.7 FG% | 60 Long | 1,032 Points | Led League in FGM 2007 (35) | 1x Pro-Bowl (07) | 1x All-Pro (07)


P: Brett Kern (2009-Present)

42,333 Punt Yds | 79 Long | 45.9 Yds/Punt | Led League in Long 2014 (79) | Led League in Yds/Punt 2017 (49.7) | 3x Pro-Bowl (17, 18, 19) | 1x All-Pro (19)


The current punter for the Titans, Brett Kern, is the best the franchise has ever had. He's averaged just under 46 yards per punt and led the league in long once and yards per punt once as well. Kern's been named to three Pro-Bowls and one All-Pro Team. Greg Montgomery led the league in yards per punt three different times, but he was only with Houston for six years.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Jim Norton (1960-1968) | 21,961 Punt Yds | 79 Long | 42.1 Yds/Punt | Led League in Punt Yds 1965 (3,711) | Led League in Long 1964 (79) | 3x Pro-Bowl (62, 63, 67)

  2. Greg Montgomery (1988-1993) | 13,529 Punt Yds | 77 Long | 43.6 Yds/Punt | Led League in Yds/Punt 1990, 1992 and 1993 (45, 46.9, 45.6) | 1x Pro-Bowl (93) | 1x All-Pro (93)

  3. Craig Hentrich (1998-2009) | 36,926 Punt Yds | 78 Long | 42.9 Yds/Punt | Led League in Yds/Punt 1998 (47.2) | 2x Pro-Bowl (98, 03) | 1x All-Pro (98)

Returner: Billy “White Shoes” Johnson (1974-1980)

2,040 Punt Rt Yds | 5 Punt Rt TD | 13.2 Yds/Punt Rt | 2,902 Kick Rt Yds | 2 Kick Rt TD | 24.0 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Punt Rt TD 1975 and 1977 (3, 2) | Led League in Yds/Punt Rt 1975 and 1977 (15.3, 15.4) | Led League in Kick Rt TD 1975 (1) | 2x Pro-Bowl (75, 77) | 1x All-Pro (77) | Hall of Fame All-1970s Team | Hall of Fame All-1980s Team

This was a pretty easy decision. Billy "White Shoes" Johnson is one of the greatest returners of all-time. He totaled just under 5,000 total return yards with the Oilers and took five punts and two kicks back for a touchdown. Johnson led the league in punt return touchdowns twice, yards per punt return twice and kick return touchdowns once as well. He was named to two Pro-Bowls, one All-Pro Team and both the Hall of fame All-1980s and All-1990s Teams. I've said it before and I'll say it again, special teams' players deserve consideration from the Hall of Fame. Johnson deserves a bust in Canton.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Carl Roaches (1980-1984) | 1,095 Punt Rt Yds | 7.3 Yds/Punt Rt | 3,276 Kick Rt Yds | 2 Kick Rt TD | 21.8 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Kick Rt TD 1981 and 1983 (1, 1) | Led League in Kick Rt Long 1983 (97) | 1x Pro-Bowl (81)

  2. Derrick Mason (1997-2004) | 1,590 Punt Rt Yds | 2 Punt Rt TD | 8.7 Yds/Punt Rt | 3,496 Kick Rt Yds | 1 Kick Rt TD | 22.4 Yds/Kick Rt | Led League in Punt Rt Yds 2000 (662) | Led League in Kick Rt Long 2001 (101) | 2x Pro-Bowl (00, 03) | 1x All-Pro (00)

Head Coach: Jeff Fisher (1994-2010)

Regular Season: 142-120 | 54.2 W-L% | Playoffs: 5-6 | 1999 AFC Champion

Finally, we come to the head coach. Jeff Fisher gets this spot. He led the Titans/Oilers for 17 seasons, guiding them to six winning seasons and six playoff appearances. He's the franchise leader in wins with 142 and he came up just one yard short from a Super Bowl victory in 1999. Lou Rymkus and Wally Lemm both won championships, but they weren't with the team for very long. Just two and six seasons respectively.


Honorable Mentions

  1. Lou Rymkus (1960-1961) | Regular Season: 11-7-1 | 61.1 W-L% | Playoffs: 1-0 | 1960 AFL Champion

  2. Wally Lemm (1961, 1966-1970) | Regular Season: 37-38-4 | 49.3 W-L% | Playoffs: 1-2 | 1961 AFL Champion

  3. Pop Ivy (1962-1963) | Regular Season: 17-11 | 60.7 W-L% | Playoffs: 0-1 | 1962 AFL Championship Appearance

  4. Bum Phillips (1975-1980) | Regular Season: 55-35 | 61.1 W-L% | Playoffs: 4-3

  5. Jerry Glanville (1985-1989) | Regular Season: 33-32 | 50.8 W-L% | Playoffs: 2-3

  6. Jack Pardee (1990-1994) | Regular Season: 43-31 | 58.1 W-L% | Playoffs: 1-4

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